Walking blood bank


SEATTLE, WASHINGTON A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says “takes the banking out of blood banking.”

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks � like battlefields – combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. “Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available — and the logistics and the refrigeration required — simply isn’t feasible in the near term.”

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn’t quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says “takes the banking out of blood banking.”

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks � like battlefields – combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. “Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available — and the logistics and the refrigeration required — simply isn’t feasible in the near term.”

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn’t quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

Daryl and Merle Dixon are known around for their involvement in the local biker gang as well as their involvement in the drug market. When Merle is hospitalized after gang stand off things begin to go to shit. When Daryl meets 17 year old Beth Greene in the hospital he realizes he isn't the only one with issues.

Maybe it was the sleepless night in an uncomfortable hospital bed. Or maybe it was the man in the hallway pacing back and forth in front of her door.

Even when baby Judith, The child of a family friend that she watched, would fling her food from her high chair Beth did not get annoyed. She would simply bend over and pick up the discarded cheerios, casting a smile at the mischievous baby before pouring fresh ones on to her plate.

But today was a different day. And a whole hell of a lot had happened in the last twenty four hours. She was restless and felt like complete shit. So as she heard him pass once and then two times more past her opened door she found herself pulling up out of bed in a huff.

She tugged on a cardigan that her sister Maggie had brought her from home (Being mindful of the IV sticking out of her arm, of course) and stomped her way to the open door.

She watched him freeze and look over his shoulder down at her. She could see the confusion written across his face. As if he was surprised to see someone talking to him that way.

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says “takes the banking out of blood banking.”

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks � like battlefields – combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. “Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available — and the logistics and the refrigeration required — simply isn’t feasible in the near term.”

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn’t quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

Daryl and Merle Dixon are known around for their involvement in the local biker gang as well as their involvement in the drug market. When Merle is hospitalized after gang stand off things begin to go to shit. When Daryl meets 17 year old Beth Greene in the hospital he realizes he isn't the only one with issues.

Maybe it was the sleepless night in an uncomfortable hospital bed. Or maybe it was the man in the hallway pacing back and forth in front of her door.

Even when baby Judith, The child of a family friend that she watched, would fling her food from her high chair Beth did not get annoyed. She would simply bend over and pick up the discarded cheerios, casting a smile at the mischievous baby before pouring fresh ones on to her plate.

But today was a different day. And a whole hell of a lot had happened in the last twenty four hours. She was restless and felt like complete shit. So as she heard him pass once and then two times more past her opened door she found herself pulling up out of bed in a huff.

She tugged on a cardigan that her sister Maggie had brought her from home (Being mindful of the IV sticking out of her arm, of course) and stomped her way to the open door.

She watched him freeze and look over his shoulder down at her. She could see the confusion written across his face. As if he was surprised to see someone talking to him that way.

A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says "takes the banking out of blood banking."

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks – like battlefields - combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. "Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available -- and the logistics and the refrigeration required -- simply isn't feasible in the near term."

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn't quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says “takes the banking out of blood banking.”

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks � like battlefields – combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. “Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available — and the logistics and the refrigeration required — simply isn’t feasible in the near term.”

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn’t quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

Daryl and Merle Dixon are known around for their involvement in the local biker gang as well as their involvement in the drug market. When Merle is hospitalized after gang stand off things begin to go to shit. When Daryl meets 17 year old Beth Greene in the hospital he realizes he isn't the only one with issues.

Maybe it was the sleepless night in an uncomfortable hospital bed. Or maybe it was the man in the hallway pacing back and forth in front of her door.

Even when baby Judith, The child of a family friend that she watched, would fling her food from her high chair Beth did not get annoyed. She would simply bend over and pick up the discarded cheerios, casting a smile at the mischievous baby before pouring fresh ones on to her plate.

But today was a different day. And a whole hell of a lot had happened in the last twenty four hours. She was restless and felt like complete shit. So as she heard him pass once and then two times more past her opened door she found herself pulling up out of bed in a huff.

She tugged on a cardigan that her sister Maggie had brought her from home (Being mindful of the IV sticking out of her arm, of course) and stomped her way to the open door.

She watched him freeze and look over his shoulder down at her. She could see the confusion written across his face. As if he was surprised to see someone talking to him that way.

A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says "takes the banking out of blood banking."

A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death. Hospitals have stored blood on hand for people gravely injured in car accidents, and new mothers suffering from potentially fatal postpartum hemorrhaging. In areas far from hospitals and blood banks – like battlefields - combat medics have trained to do a procedure sometimes called a buddy transfusion. They rapidly collect and transfuse blood on scene after making a match between donor and patient.

Linda Barnes, chief operating officer at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle, says the military was the model for what is, essentially, a walking blood bank. "Blood banking of stored blood certainly is not going away anytime soon. But in low resource settings, having banked blood available -- and the logistics and the refrigeration required -- simply isn't feasible in the near term."

Barnes has done a lot of international consulting about strengthening blood systems in places such as Ivory Coast, Kenya, Ukraine and the Caribbean islands. One thing from those trips that nagged her was how many patients in the developing world die each year for lack of blood, especially women giving birth. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 100,000 new mothers perish from profuse bleeding after childbirth each year.

Barnes and a colleague challenged themselves to build a simple, self-contained blood transfusion kit in a shoebox. The off-the-shelf components they assembled didn't quite fit into a shoebox, so the Bloodpak expanded to backpack size.

It contains everything caregivers at remote rural clinics need to collect and transfuse blood: from alcohol wipes and bandages to blood typing and disease testing test kits to sterile catheters and needles. There are enough supplies to collect blood from six donors.

walking blood bank
  n. — «That day was mad, with every surgeon and anesthetist in a constant sprint, and the I.C.U. full, blood everywhere. We emptied the blood bank and had to activate the walking blood bank. Soldiers lined up outside the hospital a hundred deep to donate.» —“Market Forces” by Kevin Patterson  New York Times  July 1, 2007. (source: Double-Tongued Dictionary )


Walking Blood Banks - Blood Care Foundation

Walking Blood Bank Helps Troops Save Each Other - On Patrol

    SEATTLE, WASHINGTON A blood network in the Pacific Northwest has developed a kit for transfusions in remote places that it says “takes the banking out of blood banking.”A blood transfusion can often be the difference between life and death.
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