Walking blood clot in leg


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By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use .

Blood clots are clumps of blood that have changed from a liquid to a solid state. Normally, blood clots are good. For example, when you get a wound, a blood clot will form a scab at the location of the lesion. This stops the bleeding. However, when blood clots form in the veins of your body (called a thrombus) it can be very dangerous.

When a blood clot forms in your calf/thigh/groin area, the clot is called a Deep Vein Thrombosis or a DVT. This type of clot can interfere with blood flow and causes serious health conditions such as a Pulmonary Embolism - which is when the blood clot travels to your lungs and blocks the pulmonary artery and prevents oxygenated blood to flow to your lung.

When someone is suspected to have a blood clot in their leg (DVT) , a doctor will ask a set of questions to determine the chance of a DVT and what tests to perform next. These questions are based on the Wells Score for a DVT , which is what this Blood Clot Calculator uses.

This Blood Clot Calculator is what doctors use to initially diagnose you to figure out what tests to do next. Use it yourself by clicking below.

If you have any of the symptoms below then call your doctor right away so that your doctor can perform DVT tests and a DVT diagnosis to determine if you have a DVT.

When diagnosing for a DVT your doctor will do a physical and go through your health, medical history, and symptoms. Additionally, you will be asked the questions in the above DVT Calculator to get your Wells Score.

Your doctor has ordered special sleeves or stockings for you to wear on your legs to help stop blood clots from forming in your legs while you are in the hospital. The sleeves are called Sequential Compression Device (SCD) system and the stockings are Thrombo Embolic Deterrent hose (TED ® hose). These sleeves and stockings help keep pressure on the legs to help stop blood from clotting. 

Along with the SCDs or TED hose, your doctor may order other methods to prevent blood clots. These may include taking medications to thin your blood, doing ankle-pumping exercises, getting out of bed and walking around, or going to physical therapy. Any or all of these may help to stop blood clots.

You may be at higher risk for forming blood clots for many reasons. These may include, but are not limited to, the following:

The sleeves wrap snugly around the lower legs and should be loose enough to place two fingers between the sleeves and your leg. You should not feel any numbness or tingling while the sleeves are on your legs. If you feel numbness or tingling, please notify your nurse right away.

These sleeves are plugged into hoses with an electric motor. The motor will pump air into the sleeves and will massage your legs, sending the blood back to your heart. If the sleeves are turned off or taken off, you are not protected from forming blood clots.

Your sleeves are to be removed about every eight hours for your bath and blood-flow checks, or as needed for your condition. If your sleeves are off more than an hour at one time, please call your nurse to put the sleeves back on. When getting out of bed or walking, it is important for your safety to remove the sleeves from your legs and put on slippers or shoes to help prevent a slip or fall. When you return to bed, the sleeves should be placed back around your legs. The sleeves should also be on when you are sitting in a chair.

There is a lot of pain in my leg. I did not even stand after 4 o'clock in the evening and my foot's veins became red. I am worried about deep vein thrombosis.

I have got deep vein thrombosis in my leg. I have been on apixaban 10 mg and the dose has been reduced to 5 mg but my leg has started swelling again.

I am 29. My right leg, lower back and bottom area was hurting for awhile, and I had chalked it up to a roller derby injury. Last week, I mowed my lawn, and had to stop several times because of the pain in my leg. I took a shower later and when I got out, my right leg was purple and swollen. I went to the ER, and was admitted. I have clots from my groin to my knee. I spent 3 days in the hospital. I had to take injections in my tummy for 5 days, and now I am on Coumadin, which I guess I will be on for 6 months. My leg hurts still, especially in the groin area. Scary. I am really scared of the clot travelling to my lungs.

Very recently, my 20-year-old niece developed H1N1. As she worsened, seemingly with the flu, she ended up in the emergency room unable to walk. A nurse noticed swelling in a leg and urged the doctor to check for clots. She has two very large clots in her leg and her lung. She almost died. She may not survive as I type this. My brother died of a blood clot that moved from his leg to his heart. Doctors said that part of my niece's leg clot moved to her lung. So far, the clots cannot be removed. I fear my niece may die. For God's sake, something must be done about this horrible, silent, and mostly unknown disease.

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By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use .

Blood clots are clumps of blood that have changed from a liquid to a solid state. Normally, blood clots are good. For example, when you get a wound, a blood clot will form a scab at the location of the lesion. This stops the bleeding. However, when blood clots form in the veins of your body (called a thrombus) it can be very dangerous.

When a blood clot forms in your calf/thigh/groin area, the clot is called a Deep Vein Thrombosis or a DVT. This type of clot can interfere with blood flow and causes serious health conditions such as a Pulmonary Embolism - which is when the blood clot travels to your lungs and blocks the pulmonary artery and prevents oxygenated blood to flow to your lung.

When someone is suspected to have a blood clot in their leg (DVT) , a doctor will ask a set of questions to determine the chance of a DVT and what tests to perform next. These questions are based on the Wells Score for a DVT , which is what this Blood Clot Calculator uses.

This Blood Clot Calculator is what doctors use to initially diagnose you to figure out what tests to do next. Use it yourself by clicking below.

If you have any of the symptoms below then call your doctor right away so that your doctor can perform DVT tests and a DVT diagnosis to determine if you have a DVT.

When diagnosing for a DVT your doctor will do a physical and go through your health, medical history, and symptoms. Additionally, you will be asked the questions in the above DVT Calculator to get your Wells Score.

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use .

Blood clots are clumps of blood that have changed from a liquid to a solid state. Normally, blood clots are good. For example, when you get a wound, a blood clot will form a scab at the location of the lesion. This stops the bleeding. However, when blood clots form in the veins of your body (called a thrombus) it can be very dangerous.

When a blood clot forms in your calf/thigh/groin area, the clot is called a Deep Vein Thrombosis or a DVT. This type of clot can interfere with blood flow and causes serious health conditions such as a Pulmonary Embolism - which is when the blood clot travels to your lungs and blocks the pulmonary artery and prevents oxygenated blood to flow to your lung.

When someone is suspected to have a blood clot in their leg (DVT) , a doctor will ask a set of questions to determine the chance of a DVT and what tests to perform next. These questions are based on the Wells Score for a DVT , which is what this Blood Clot Calculator uses.

This Blood Clot Calculator is what doctors use to initially diagnose you to figure out what tests to do next. Use it yourself by clicking below.

If you have any of the symptoms below then call your doctor right away so that your doctor can perform DVT tests and a DVT diagnosis to determine if you have a DVT.

When diagnosing for a DVT your doctor will do a physical and go through your health, medical history, and symptoms. Additionally, you will be asked the questions in the above DVT Calculator to get your Wells Score.

Your doctor has ordered special sleeves or stockings for you to wear on your legs to help stop blood clots from forming in your legs while you are in the hospital. The sleeves are called Sequential Compression Device (SCD) system and the stockings are Thrombo Embolic Deterrent hose (TED ® hose). These sleeves and stockings help keep pressure on the legs to help stop blood from clotting. 

Along with the SCDs or TED hose, your doctor may order other methods to prevent blood clots. These may include taking medications to thin your blood, doing ankle-pumping exercises, getting out of bed and walking around, or going to physical therapy. Any or all of these may help to stop blood clots.

You may be at higher risk for forming blood clots for many reasons. These may include, but are not limited to, the following:

The sleeves wrap snugly around the lower legs and should be loose enough to place two fingers between the sleeves and your leg. You should not feel any numbness or tingling while the sleeves are on your legs. If you feel numbness or tingling, please notify your nurse right away.

These sleeves are plugged into hoses with an electric motor. The motor will pump air into the sleeves and will massage your legs, sending the blood back to your heart. If the sleeves are turned off or taken off, you are not protected from forming blood clots.

Your sleeves are to be removed about every eight hours for your bath and blood-flow checks, or as needed for your condition. If your sleeves are off more than an hour at one time, please call your nurse to put the sleeves back on. When getting out of bed or walking, it is important for your safety to remove the sleeves from your legs and put on slippers or shoes to help prevent a slip or fall. When you return to bed, the sleeves should be placed back around your legs. The sleeves should also be on when you are sitting in a chair.


Deep vein thrombosis - Wikipedia

Blood clots and Leg pain on walking - Symptom Checker.

    By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for
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