Walking blood sugar control


Low blood sugars can be very scary. Some are just irritating. They interrupt our work, our play, our family activities, and even our vacations. They require us to eat more food we might not have wanted to eat. They are annoying.

And some low blood sugars are scary. If you’ve ever had a scary blood sugar—one that dropped so low, you felt your vision crossing, your head spinning, and your brain begging you to lie down on the ground and give-up—then you’ll probably understand why I keep some form of carbohydrate tucked in as many corners as possible.

A low blood sugar can happen, sometimes, without much warning. My body is still very good at alarming me through the classic symptoms that my blood sugar is low, but every now and then, one sneaks up on me.

The number one most important place for me to keep a regular stock of carbohydrates is next to my bed. If I use up whatever carbohydrate source I put there, I am very diligent about refueling that supply.

The most common time for me to experience lows is the early in the morning, because I try to keep my blood sugar as close to 100 mg/dL as possible while I sleep. When I wake up and feel the symptoms of a low surrounding my head, the sweat and fever-like body heat surrounding my body, I actually don’t feel like getting out of bed to go find juice in the fridge.

When I’m low in the morning, I don’t want to move. I’ve even learned the hard way that my early-morning-sleepiness combined with my confusion and weakness from the low blood sugar can lead me easily to falling asleep again, without actually treating the low.

Low blood sugars can be very scary. Some are just irritating. They interrupt our work, our play, our family activities, and even our vacations. They require us to eat more food we might not have wanted to eat. They are annoying.

And some low blood sugars are scary. If you’ve ever had a scary blood sugar—one that dropped so low, you felt your vision crossing, your head spinning, and your brain begging you to lie down on the ground and give-up—then you’ll probably understand why I keep some form of carbohydrate tucked in as many corners as possible.

A low blood sugar can happen, sometimes, without much warning. My body is still very good at alarming me through the classic symptoms that my blood sugar is low, but every now and then, one sneaks up on me.

The number one most important place for me to keep a regular stock of carbohydrates is next to my bed. If I use up whatever carbohydrate source I put there, I am very diligent about refueling that supply.

The most common time for me to experience lows is the early in the morning, because I try to keep my blood sugar as close to 100 mg/dL as possible while I sleep. When I wake up and feel the symptoms of a low surrounding my head, the sweat and fever-like body heat surrounding my body, I actually don’t feel like getting out of bed to go find juice in the fridge.

When I’m low in the morning, I don’t want to move. I’ve even learned the hard way that my early-morning-sleepiness combined with my confusion and weakness from the low blood sugar can lead me easily to falling asleep again, without actually treating the low.

Varying speed while walking may make the activity much more effective. iStockphoto hide caption

From runners to cyclists to boot-camp fanatics the strategy involves alternating between periods of high-intensity and lower-intensity aerobic training.

Now, a study published in the journal Diabetologia finds that interval training may help the millions of people with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes who are trying to control their blood sugar.

As part of the study, researchers enrolled about 30 volunteers with Type 2 diabetes who were in their late 50s and early 60s.

The volunteers were divided into groups. One group was instructed to walk three minutes briskly, followed by three minutes at a more restful pace, and repeat that process for an hour.

"What we expected to see ... was that both exercising groups would have an improvement in their glucose [or blood sugar] control," says study author Thomas Solomon , an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen who studies how exercise affects glycemic control.

Seniors are more prone to developing diabetes, but a little exercise could make a big difference. A study published today in Diabetes Care found that three short walks each day after meals were as effective at reducing blood sugar over 24 hours as a single 45-minute walk at the same moderate pace.

Even better, taking an evening constitutional was found to be much more effective at lowering blood sugar following supper. The evening meal, often the largest of the day, can significantly raise 24-hour glucose levels.

The innovative exercise science study was conducted at the Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) using whole room calorimeters. Loretta DiPietro, Ph.D., chair of the SPHHS Department of Exercise Science, led the study.

"These findings are good news for people in their 70s and 80s who may feel more capable of engaging in intermittent physical activity on a daily basis," DiPietro said in a press release.

The whole room calorimeter (WRM), which looks like a very small hotel room, is a controlled-air environment for human study that allows scientists to calculate a person's energy expenditure by testing samples of air. The balance of oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced varies according to the activity level of the person in the room. The WRM also measures the body’s use of different food fuels, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

The 10 study participants spent three 48-hour periods in the small calorimeter rooms. Each room was equipped with a bed, toilet, sink, treadmill, television, and computer, leaving little room to move around.

30 minutes. That’s the minimum (according to health authorities) you should be walking every day to stay healthy. Of course, 60 minutes is even better. Furthermore, adding in some type of higher intensity exercise a few times a week is optimal.

Based on these guidelines, many people start their day with a brisk walk. And while this does indeed improve blood sugar, BP, and well-being overall, there is something even better as far as the former is concerned.

According to a recent study, the timing of your walk actually plays a big role in blood sugar control. In this experiment, researchers recruited ten overweight, pre-diabetic, and sedentary volunteers and had them walk at various times of the day.

On one day they walked 45 minutes in the morning. On another they walked 45 minutes in the afternoon. And on a third day they took three 15-minute walks – one after each meal.

As it turns out, walking after eating fared best in terms of lowering blood sugar. And the results aren’t all that surprising. In fact, it makes perfect sense. According to the study’s lead researcher, Loretta DiPietro, “ A post meal walk is timed to when blood glucose just starts to climb… The muscle activity and the muscle contractions help to clear glucose… It’s like another set of hands to help the pancreas halt the surge of glucose. ”

For starters, skip the morning walk. It’s much better to move throughout the day on a constant basis rather then schedule a certain time in the day to “get your exercise in”. And as the study shows, when this movement closely follows a meal, it helps clear blood sugar even better.

Low blood sugars can be very scary. Some are just irritating. They interrupt our work, our play, our family activities, and even our vacations. They require us to eat more food we might not have wanted to eat. They are annoying.

And some low blood sugars are scary. If you’ve ever had a scary blood sugar—one that dropped so low, you felt your vision crossing, your head spinning, and your brain begging you to lie down on the ground and give-up—then you’ll probably understand why I keep some form of carbohydrate tucked in as many corners as possible.

A low blood sugar can happen, sometimes, without much warning. My body is still very good at alarming me through the classic symptoms that my blood sugar is low, but every now and then, one sneaks up on me.

The number one most important place for me to keep a regular stock of carbohydrates is next to my bed. If I use up whatever carbohydrate source I put there, I am very diligent about refueling that supply.

The most common time for me to experience lows is the early in the morning, because I try to keep my blood sugar as close to 100 mg/dL as possible while I sleep. When I wake up and feel the symptoms of a low surrounding my head, the sweat and fever-like body heat surrounding my body, I actually don’t feel like getting out of bed to go find juice in the fridge.

When I’m low in the morning, I don’t want to move. I’ve even learned the hard way that my early-morning-sleepiness combined with my confusion and weakness from the low blood sugar can lead me easily to falling asleep again, without actually treating the low.

Varying speed while walking may make the activity much more effective. iStockphoto hide caption

From runners to cyclists to boot-camp fanatics the strategy involves alternating between periods of high-intensity and lower-intensity aerobic training.

Now, a study published in the journal Diabetologia finds that interval training may help the millions of people with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes who are trying to control their blood sugar.

As part of the study, researchers enrolled about 30 volunteers with Type 2 diabetes who were in their late 50s and early 60s.

The volunteers were divided into groups. One group was instructed to walk three minutes briskly, followed by three minutes at a more restful pace, and repeat that process for an hour.

"What we expected to see ... was that both exercising groups would have an improvement in their glucose [or blood sugar] control," says study author Thomas Solomon , an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen who studies how exercise affects glycemic control.

Low blood sugars can be very scary. Some are just irritating. They interrupt our work, our play, our family activities, and even our vacations. They require us to eat more food we might not have wanted to eat. They are annoying.

And some low blood sugars are scary. If you’ve ever had a scary blood sugar—one that dropped so low, you felt your vision crossing, your head spinning, and your brain begging you to lie down on the ground and give-up—then you’ll probably understand why I keep some form of carbohydrate tucked in as many corners as possible.

A low blood sugar can happen, sometimes, without much warning. My body is still very good at alarming me through the classic symptoms that my blood sugar is low, but every now and then, one sneaks up on me.

The number one most important place for me to keep a regular stock of carbohydrates is next to my bed. If I use up whatever carbohydrate source I put there, I am very diligent about refueling that supply.

The most common time for me to experience lows is the early in the morning, because I try to keep my blood sugar as close to 100 mg/dL as possible while I sleep. When I wake up and feel the symptoms of a low surrounding my head, the sweat and fever-like body heat surrounding my body, I actually don’t feel like getting out of bed to go find juice in the fridge.

When I’m low in the morning, I don’t want to move. I’ve even learned the hard way that my early-morning-sleepiness combined with my confusion and weakness from the low blood sugar can lead me easily to falling asleep again, without actually treating the low.

Varying speed while walking may make the activity much more effective. iStockphoto hide caption

From runners to cyclists to boot-camp fanatics the strategy involves alternating between periods of high-intensity and lower-intensity aerobic training.

Now, a study published in the journal Diabetologia finds that interval training may help the millions of people with Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes who are trying to control their blood sugar.

As part of the study, researchers enrolled about 30 volunteers with Type 2 diabetes who were in their late 50s and early 60s.

The volunteers were divided into groups. One group was instructed to walk three minutes briskly, followed by three minutes at a more restful pace, and repeat that process for an hour.

"What we expected to see ... was that both exercising groups would have an improvement in their glucose [or blood sugar] control," says study author Thomas Solomon , an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen who studies how exercise affects glycemic control.

Seniors are more prone to developing diabetes, but a little exercise could make a big difference. A study published today in Diabetes Care found that three short walks each day after meals were as effective at reducing blood sugar over 24 hours as a single 45-minute walk at the same moderate pace.

Even better, taking an evening constitutional was found to be much more effective at lowering blood sugar following supper. The evening meal, often the largest of the day, can significantly raise 24-hour glucose levels.

The innovative exercise science study was conducted at the Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) using whole room calorimeters. Loretta DiPietro, Ph.D., chair of the SPHHS Department of Exercise Science, led the study.

"These findings are good news for people in their 70s and 80s who may feel more capable of engaging in intermittent physical activity on a daily basis," DiPietro said in a press release.

The whole room calorimeter (WRM), which looks like a very small hotel room, is a controlled-air environment for human study that allows scientists to calculate a person's energy expenditure by testing samples of air. The balance of oxygen consumed and carbon dioxide produced varies according to the activity level of the person in the room. The WRM also measures the body’s use of different food fuels, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

The 10 study participants spent three 48-hour periods in the small calorimeter rooms. Each room was equipped with a bed, toilet, sink, treadmill, television, and computer, leaving little room to move around.


Really? The Claim: Taking a Walk After a Meal Aids.

Skip Your Morning Walk To Lower Blood Sugar (Do This.

    Low blood sugars can be very scary. Some are just irritating. They interrupt our work, our play, our family activities, and even our vacations. They require us to eat more food we might not have wanted to eat. They are annoying.And some low blood sugars
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