Starship captains quarters designs


I love sci-fi and space exploration shows. There’s something about people gallivanting through universe in search of what’s beyond the stars that speaks to my heart in ways few other genres can.

At the center of many of these stories is the captain, the person most often made the protagonist or at the very least a person to look up to during the journey. TV has been the birth place of many of the most beloved captains in all of science fiction/fantasy, but among all the names, who stands above the rest?

3. How adept was the individual at captaining said ship(s) and managing the crew (only ships with crews count, no one seaters on this list).

Oh, and to preemptively nip any complaints about featuring so many Star Trek captains in the bud, understand that Star Trek is one of the longest lasting and most important franchises in all of science fiction and to try and limit myself to one captain in all the series’ history is an insult to this outstanding franchise. Plus it’s my list, so tough toenails.

I love the Doctor. I’ve written plenty of articles on him and have reviewed a bunch of Big Finish audio dramas starring him in my series Big Finishing Move here on One Of Us, so you can say I’m a bit of a fan. He is one of my favorite fictional characters of all time. His ship, the TARDIS is easily the most impressive vessel of all the captains on this list as it can travel through all of space as well as time.

Why then if I love him so much do I rate the rouge Time Lord at the bottom of this list? To put it simply, the Doctor is a lousy captain. Not only is his command of his ship tenuous, but his crew never listens to him. Many of his companions over the years are known for their willingness to blow the Doctor off and do their own thing. The Doctor may be one of the universe’s greatest heroes, but his abilities as a captain leave much to be desired.

I love sci-fi and space exploration shows. There’s something about people gallivanting through universe in search of what’s beyond the stars that speaks to my heart in ways few other genres can.

At the center of many of these stories is the captain, the person most often made the protagonist or at the very least a person to look up to during the journey. TV has been the birth place of many of the most beloved captains in all of science fiction/fantasy, but among all the names, who stands above the rest?

3. How adept was the individual at captaining said ship(s) and managing the crew (only ships with crews count, no one seaters on this list).

Oh, and to preemptively nip any complaints about featuring so many Star Trek captains in the bud, understand that Star Trek is one of the longest lasting and most important franchises in all of science fiction and to try and limit myself to one captain in all the series’ history is an insult to this outstanding franchise. Plus it’s my list, so tough toenails.

I love the Doctor. I’ve written plenty of articles on him and have reviewed a bunch of Big Finish audio dramas starring him in my series Big Finishing Move here on One Of Us, so you can say I’m a bit of a fan. He is one of my favorite fictional characters of all time. His ship, the TARDIS is easily the most impressive vessel of all the captains on this list as it can travel through all of space as well as time.

Why then if I love him so much do I rate the rouge Time Lord at the bottom of this list? To put it simply, the Doctor is a lousy captain. Not only is his command of his ship tenuous, but his crew never listens to him. Many of his companions over the years are known for their willingness to blow the Doctor off and do their own thing. The Doctor may be one of the universe’s greatest heroes, but his abilities as a captain leave much to be desired.

The Captain’s Career Course, also referred to as CCC provides a rigorous course of instruction to prepare Company Grade Officers to perform the most difficult job our Army has to offer – leading Soldiers in combat .

Following selection for promotion to the rank of Captain, Company Grade Officers normally attend their respective branch Captain’s Career Course.

The course combines the instruction formerly taught in the branch Officer Advanced Course (OAC) and the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3).

Most of the students had different experiences and backgrounds, which led to interesting conversations and valuable lessons.

Upon graduation from the Captain’s Career Course, students will be prepared to assume Company Command or serve on a Battalion or Brigade level staff, joint and multi-national environments.

In essence, the Captains Career Course provides first Lieutenants and Captains with a common foundation of operational and leadership instruction tied to the Officer ‘s specific career field, branch and functional area needs.

Starting in 1997 and running through all of '98, the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, in Washington, DC, held an exhibit of the models, props, and costumes used in the creation of George Lucas' first Star Wars® film trilogy (episodes 4 thru 6). This outstanding display allowed the public (and Starship Modeler ) to get a good, close look at the ship models from this landmark series. Naturally we had cameras in tow, and the results are displayed here. The display has since begun touring the country and around the world, with props and macquettes from each new film being added.

A special thanks goes out to Mark Dickson, Jim Berteges, David Ferrell, Bob Keyes, Mark Bolden, Jacques Duquette, Richard Moore, Ken Rice, Mick Selas and Murray Swift for their additional contributions to this gallery.

In addition to its overblown drive system, the Falcon features an enhanced weapons array, including ventral and dorsal quad laser cannons, a small antipersonnel blaster, and a rack of concussion missiles. The ship also has a series of hidden compartments designed for carrying contraband. Solo was drawn into the Rebel cause after he was hired to shuttle Obi Wan Kenobi and Luke Skywalker to Alderaan for a rescue mission.

The Falcon model on display at the Smithsonian was quite large. While it was the last thing you saw on the tour, the impact of seeing this icon was not at all lessened by the plethora of Star Wars artifacts seen before it. This model is very large (about 5' across) and deliciously detailed. It was housed in a low glass case, so it was difficult to get the shot one wanted without glare. Still, we managed to shoot this glorious model from a number of angles and zoom in for some key detail shots. You may note some unusual glowing strips in some of the photos. The model was adorned with an odd pattern of Scotchbright tape strips, which only showed up during flash photography.

We're not sure where the X-Wing in the Smithsonian's exhibit was used, but it was big. About four feet, big! This certainly wasn't one of the ones used in the original film. The detail on this model was rich!

The A-Wing has been seen only in Return of the Jedi (so far). The studio model is reasonably detailed and a little over two feet long. ERTL's kit, the only mainstream model of this ship, is a surprisingly faithful replica - outside the cockpit, at least.

I love sci-fi and space exploration shows. There’s something about people gallivanting through universe in search of what’s beyond the stars that speaks to my heart in ways few other genres can.

At the center of many of these stories is the captain, the person most often made the protagonist or at the very least a person to look up to during the journey. TV has been the birth place of many of the most beloved captains in all of science fiction/fantasy, but among all the names, who stands above the rest?

3. How adept was the individual at captaining said ship(s) and managing the crew (only ships with crews count, no one seaters on this list).

Oh, and to preemptively nip any complaints about featuring so many Star Trek captains in the bud, understand that Star Trek is one of the longest lasting and most important franchises in all of science fiction and to try and limit myself to one captain in all the series’ history is an insult to this outstanding franchise. Plus it’s my list, so tough toenails.

I love the Doctor. I’ve written plenty of articles on him and have reviewed a bunch of Big Finish audio dramas starring him in my series Big Finishing Move here on One Of Us, so you can say I’m a bit of a fan. He is one of my favorite fictional characters of all time. His ship, the TARDIS is easily the most impressive vessel of all the captains on this list as it can travel through all of space as well as time.

Why then if I love him so much do I rate the rouge Time Lord at the bottom of this list? To put it simply, the Doctor is a lousy captain. Not only is his command of his ship tenuous, but his crew never listens to him. Many of his companions over the years are known for their willingness to blow the Doctor off and do their own thing. The Doctor may be one of the universe’s greatest heroes, but his abilities as a captain leave much to be desired.

The Captain’s Career Course, also referred to as CCC provides a rigorous course of instruction to prepare Company Grade Officers to perform the most difficult job our Army has to offer – leading Soldiers in combat .

Following selection for promotion to the rank of Captain, Company Grade Officers normally attend their respective branch Captain’s Career Course.

The course combines the instruction formerly taught in the branch Officer Advanced Course (OAC) and the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3).

Most of the students had different experiences and backgrounds, which led to interesting conversations and valuable lessons.

Upon graduation from the Captain’s Career Course, students will be prepared to assume Company Command or serve on a Battalion or Brigade level staff, joint and multi-national environments.

In essence, the Captains Career Course provides first Lieutenants and Captains with a common foundation of operational and leadership instruction tied to the Officer ‘s specific career field, branch and functional area needs.

Starting in 1997 and running through all of '98, the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, in Washington, DC, held an exhibit of the models, props, and costumes used in the creation of George Lucas' first Star Wars® film trilogy (episodes 4 thru 6). This outstanding display allowed the public (and Starship Modeler ) to get a good, close look at the ship models from this landmark series. Naturally we had cameras in tow, and the results are displayed here. The display has since begun touring the country and around the world, with props and macquettes from each new film being added.

A special thanks goes out to Mark Dickson, Jim Berteges, David Ferrell, Bob Keyes, Mark Bolden, Jacques Duquette, Richard Moore, Ken Rice, Mick Selas and Murray Swift for their additional contributions to this gallery.

In addition to its overblown drive system, the Falcon features an enhanced weapons array, including ventral and dorsal quad laser cannons, a small antipersonnel blaster, and a rack of concussion missiles. The ship also has a series of hidden compartments designed for carrying contraband. Solo was drawn into the Rebel cause after he was hired to shuttle Obi Wan Kenobi and Luke Skywalker to Alderaan for a rescue mission.

The Falcon model on display at the Smithsonian was quite large. While it was the last thing you saw on the tour, the impact of seeing this icon was not at all lessened by the plethora of Star Wars artifacts seen before it. This model is very large (about 5' across) and deliciously detailed. It was housed in a low glass case, so it was difficult to get the shot one wanted without glare. Still, we managed to shoot this glorious model from a number of angles and zoom in for some key detail shots. You may note some unusual glowing strips in some of the photos. The model was adorned with an odd pattern of Scotchbright tape strips, which only showed up during flash photography.

We're not sure where the X-Wing in the Smithsonian's exhibit was used, but it was big. About four feet, big! This certainly wasn't one of the ones used in the original film. The detail on this model was rich!

The A-Wing has been seen only in Return of the Jedi (so far). The studio model is reasonably detailed and a little over two feet long. ERTL's kit, the only mainstream model of this ship, is a surprisingly faithful replica - outside the cockpit, at least.

NEW YORK – For a few hours on Saturday night (July 30), the decommissioned aircraft carrier the U.S.S. Intrepid took not to the seas again, but to the stars. In command: William Shatner, "Star Trek" Captain James T. Kirk, whose new documentary "The Captains" aired to a packed crowd on the flight deck of the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum.  

In the film, the former starship Enterprise captain goes on a mission of personal rather than cosmic exploration. Despite a long and award-winning acting career, Shatner's most prominent role by far remains Kirk.

To try to understand how the character has shaped his life, and vice versa, Shatner visits the five actors who also played lead captain roles in the "Star Trek" franchise's television series and films . What unfolds is a series of intimate interviews that discuss how the actors dealt with the demands of the role, what being captain meant and how they ever got into acting at all. [ See photos from the New York screening ]

"My hope is to delve deeply into these actors' psyches, find out more about them so you can . .  see what common denominator there is among us as actors that brought [us] to this worldwide renown as part of 'Star Trek ,'" Shatner explained in a statement.

An all-ages crowd of more than a thousand people attended the weekend event, some of whom waited on line for two hours or more to get on board the Intrepid. Making this particular site all the more poignant is that the "actual" starship Enterprise – NASA's first prototype space shuttle that was used in landing and glide tests in the late 1970s, and was named after the sci-fi vessel – will soon be housed at the museum .

A costume contest was held for the many dozens of people who donned Starfleet uniforms and other "Star Trek" paraphernalia. One woman even wore a homemade, light-up model of the starship Enterprise atop her head. [ The Top 10 Star Trek Technologies ]

I love sci-fi and space exploration shows. There’s something about people gallivanting through universe in search of what’s beyond the stars that speaks to my heart in ways few other genres can.

At the center of many of these stories is the captain, the person most often made the protagonist or at the very least a person to look up to during the journey. TV has been the birth place of many of the most beloved captains in all of science fiction/fantasy, but among all the names, who stands above the rest?

3. How adept was the individual at captaining said ship(s) and managing the crew (only ships with crews count, no one seaters on this list).

Oh, and to preemptively nip any complaints about featuring so many Star Trek captains in the bud, understand that Star Trek is one of the longest lasting and most important franchises in all of science fiction and to try and limit myself to one captain in all the series’ history is an insult to this outstanding franchise. Plus it’s my list, so tough toenails.

I love the Doctor. I’ve written plenty of articles on him and have reviewed a bunch of Big Finish audio dramas starring him in my series Big Finishing Move here on One Of Us, so you can say I’m a bit of a fan. He is one of my favorite fictional characters of all time. His ship, the TARDIS is easily the most impressive vessel of all the captains on this list as it can travel through all of space as well as time.

Why then if I love him so much do I rate the rouge Time Lord at the bottom of this list? To put it simply, the Doctor is a lousy captain. Not only is his command of his ship tenuous, but his crew never listens to him. Many of his companions over the years are known for their willingness to blow the Doctor off and do their own thing. The Doctor may be one of the universe’s greatest heroes, but his abilities as a captain leave much to be desired.

The Captain’s Career Course, also referred to as CCC provides a rigorous course of instruction to prepare Company Grade Officers to perform the most difficult job our Army has to offer – leading Soldiers in combat .

Following selection for promotion to the rank of Captain, Company Grade Officers normally attend their respective branch Captain’s Career Course.

The course combines the instruction formerly taught in the branch Officer Advanced Course (OAC) and the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3).

Most of the students had different experiences and backgrounds, which led to interesting conversations and valuable lessons.

Upon graduation from the Captain’s Career Course, students will be prepared to assume Company Command or serve on a Battalion or Brigade level staff, joint and multi-national environments.

In essence, the Captains Career Course provides first Lieutenants and Captains with a common foundation of operational and leadership instruction tied to the Officer ‘s specific career field, branch and functional area needs.


Cool Starship - TV Tropes

Public Dinner Cruises - Clearwater | Yacht StarShip

    I love sci-fi and space exploration shows. There’s something about people gallivanting through universe in search of what’s beyond the stars that speaks to my heart in ways few other genres can.At the center of many of these stories is the
41qwU3mO3lL