Starship captain beard


A beard was a growth of facial hair that was common among humanoids . In numerous species, such as Humans , the growth of facial hair was a secondary sexual characteristic of the male of the species. Not all males allowed their beards to grow, and they were generally removed by shaving them regularly with a razor . ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture ; TNG : " Code of Honor "; DS9 : " Past Tense, Part I "; Star Trek: Insurrection ; VOY : " Year of Hell "; ENT : " Unexpected ") Most Tellarites also wore beards.

Data experimented with wearing what he described as "a fine, full, dignified beard" in early 2365 . Data felt that such a beard "commands respect and projects thoughtfulness and dignity." His crewmates described his beard as being "very different", and were especially amused after Data began stroking it and inquiring whether such actions made him appear more intellectual. ( TNG : " The Schizoid Man ")

Beverly Crusher believed that with the invention of the razor, beards had become little more than an affectation. She attempted to goad bearded Riker , Worf , and Geordi La Forge into betting a clean shave in a round of poker . The game was interrupted by a page for the senior staff , however. ( TNG : " The Quality of Life ")

Facial hair was a common evil trait in Human storytelling. In the wake of Admiral Norah Satie 's witch-hunts in 2367 , Captain Jean-Luc Picard told Lieutenant Worf, who was disgusted with his own conduct (he had strongly supported, and even assisted, her investigations until she made an accusation against Picard which he knew to be false), that " villains who twirl their mustaches are easy to spot. Those who clothe themselves in good deeds are well camouflaged ". ( TNG : " The Drumhead ")

Worf regularly had his beard cut in Mot 's barbershop aboard the USS Enterprise -D . ( TNG : " Schisms ") When Worf's adopted mother, Helena Rozhenko , noticed "a touch of gray" in his beard, she reassured him that " Rozhenko men have always had beards of iron gray. " ( TNG : " New Ground ")

Bajorans were capable of growing beards. Although not necessarily required for religious reasons, some Bajoran monks and ranjens wore beards. ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine )

A beard was a growth of facial hair that was common among humanoids . In numerous species, such as Humans , the growth of facial hair was a secondary sexual characteristic of the male of the species. Not all males allowed their beards to grow, and they were generally removed by shaving them regularly with a razor . ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture ; TNG : " Code of Honor "; DS9 : " Past Tense, Part I "; Star Trek: Insurrection ; VOY : " Year of Hell "; ENT : " Unexpected ") Most Tellarites also wore beards.

Data experimented with wearing what he described as "a fine, full, dignified beard" in early 2365 . Data felt that such a beard "commands respect and projects thoughtfulness and dignity." His crewmates described his beard as being "very different", and were especially amused after Data began stroking it and inquiring whether such actions made him appear more intellectual. ( TNG : " The Schizoid Man ")

Beverly Crusher believed that with the invention of the razor, beards had become little more than an affectation. She attempted to goad bearded Riker , Worf , and Geordi La Forge into betting a clean shave in a round of poker . The game was interrupted by a page for the senior staff , however. ( TNG : " The Quality of Life ")

Facial hair was a common evil trait in Human storytelling. In the wake of Admiral Norah Satie 's witch-hunts in 2367 , Captain Jean-Luc Picard told Lieutenant Worf, who was disgusted with his own conduct (he had strongly supported, and even assisted, her investigations until she made an accusation against Picard which he knew to be false), that " villains who twirl their mustaches are easy to spot. Those who clothe themselves in good deeds are well camouflaged ". ( TNG : " The Drumhead ")

Worf regularly had his beard cut in Mot 's barbershop aboard the USS Enterprise -D . ( TNG : " Schisms ") When Worf's adopted mother, Helena Rozhenko , noticed "a touch of gray" in his beard, she reassured him that " Rozhenko men have always had beards of iron gray. " ( TNG : " New Ground ")

Bajorans were capable of growing beards. Although not necessarily required for religious reasons, some Bajoran monks and ranjens wore beards. ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine )

I have finally made it through the third episode of “Star Trek: Discovery,” long enough for the plot to settle down enough so I can evaluate whether the show matches up to my hopes . All I can say is that somebody on this show had better Grow the Beard and do it soon. This is not quite Trek as we know it, and not quite in the way you might have feared.

There was a lot of early publicity indicating that the show was going to have some tendentious political allegories. So far, they’re not really there. This is why I avoided a lot of the advance publicity for the show. Actors have a long history of not being very bright, and producers like to impress their lefty Hollywood friends by claiming political allegories in their third-rate slasher flicks. So I didn’t want to be influence by that blather, and if I hadn’t heard some of this through the Internet grapevine, I would never have known it was there.

One small scene at the beginning of the first episode captures the sense of life of Classic Trek. Our protagonist and her captain are performing a do-gooder humanitarian mission on a desert planet when an incoming sandstorm interferes with their communications, so the captain asks our heroine to go for a walk and have a talk—which turns out to be her way of signaling the ship by tracing the outline of a Federation star in the sand. It was a nice touch, it worked, and it hit all the right notes: idealism, camaraderie, ingenuity, a hint of danger, and a flourish of humor.

It was literally the second scene in the new series, and it’s the last scene of its kind that we’ve been shown so far. Shortly after that, we enter into a very different Trek. Here’s a summary of the plot up to this point, with plot spoilers—but if you haven’t already watched the shows, you probably don’t care anyway.

Our protagonist, a young woman inexplicably named Michael Burnham, is the first officer of a Federation starship under the command of Michelle Yeoh’s Captain Georgiou, who has a French name and a Chinese accent—but hey, this is the 23rd Century, after all. They encounter a Klingon ship under the leadership of a charismatic visionary who proceeds to reunify the fractious Klingon Empire in a war against the Federation. Burnam advocates that Starfleet fire be first to show the Klingons we are not to be messed with. When this strategy is refused, she mutinies and tries to shoot first anyway.

Apparently, somebody figured that if Han Solo doesn’t fire first any more in Star Wars, someone in the Trek franchise had better step up and fill the gap.

A beard was a growth of facial hair that was common among humanoids . In numerous species, such as Humans , the growth of facial hair was a secondary sexual characteristic of the male of the species. Not all males allowed their beards to grow, and they were generally removed by shaving them regularly with a razor . ( Star Trek: The Motion Picture ; TNG : " Code of Honor "; DS9 : " Past Tense, Part I "; Star Trek: Insurrection ; VOY : " Year of Hell "; ENT : " Unexpected ") Most Tellarites also wore beards.

Data experimented with wearing what he described as "a fine, full, dignified beard" in early 2365 . Data felt that such a beard "commands respect and projects thoughtfulness and dignity." His crewmates described his beard as being "very different", and were especially amused after Data began stroking it and inquiring whether such actions made him appear more intellectual. ( TNG : " The Schizoid Man ")

Beverly Crusher believed that with the invention of the razor, beards had become little more than an affectation. She attempted to goad bearded Riker , Worf , and Geordi La Forge into betting a clean shave in a round of poker . The game was interrupted by a page for the senior staff , however. ( TNG : " The Quality of Life ")

Facial hair was a common evil trait in Human storytelling. In the wake of Admiral Norah Satie 's witch-hunts in 2367 , Captain Jean-Luc Picard told Lieutenant Worf, who was disgusted with his own conduct (he had strongly supported, and even assisted, her investigations until she made an accusation against Picard which he knew to be false), that " villains who twirl their mustaches are easy to spot. Those who clothe themselves in good deeds are well camouflaged ". ( TNG : " The Drumhead ")

Worf regularly had his beard cut in Mot 's barbershop aboard the USS Enterprise -D . ( TNG : " Schisms ") When Worf's adopted mother, Helena Rozhenko , noticed "a touch of gray" in his beard, she reassured him that " Rozhenko men have always had beards of iron gray. " ( TNG : " New Ground ")

Bajorans were capable of growing beards. Although not necessarily required for religious reasons, some Bajoran monks and ranjens wore beards. ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine )

I have finally made it through the third episode of “Star Trek: Discovery,” long enough for the plot to settle down enough so I can evaluate whether the show matches up to my hopes . All I can say is that somebody on this show had better Grow the Beard and do it soon. This is not quite Trek as we know it, and not quite in the way you might have feared.

There was a lot of early publicity indicating that the show was going to have some tendentious political allegories. So far, they’re not really there. This is why I avoided a lot of the advance publicity for the show. Actors have a long history of not being very bright, and producers like to impress their lefty Hollywood friends by claiming political allegories in their third-rate slasher flicks. So I didn’t want to be influence by that blather, and if I hadn’t heard some of this through the Internet grapevine, I would never have known it was there.

One small scene at the beginning of the first episode captures the sense of life of Classic Trek. Our protagonist and her captain are performing a do-gooder humanitarian mission on a desert planet when an incoming sandstorm interferes with their communications, so the captain asks our heroine to go for a walk and have a talk—which turns out to be her way of signaling the ship by tracing the outline of a Federation star in the sand. It was a nice touch, it worked, and it hit all the right notes: idealism, camaraderie, ingenuity, a hint of danger, and a flourish of humor.

It was literally the second scene in the new series, and it’s the last scene of its kind that we’ve been shown so far. Shortly after that, we enter into a very different Trek. Here’s a summary of the plot up to this point, with plot spoilers—but if you haven’t already watched the shows, you probably don’t care anyway.

Our protagonist, a young woman inexplicably named Michael Burnham, is the first officer of a Federation starship under the command of Michelle Yeoh’s Captain Georgiou, who has a French name and a Chinese accent—but hey, this is the 23rd Century, after all. They encounter a Klingon ship under the leadership of a charismatic visionary who proceeds to reunify the fractious Klingon Empire in a war against the Federation. Burnam advocates that Starfleet fire be first to show the Klingons we are not to be messed with. When this strategy is refused, she mutinies and tries to shoot first anyway.

Apparently, somebody figured that if Han Solo doesn’t fire first any more in Star Wars, someone in the Trek franchise had better step up and fill the gap.

Every week, Heat Vision 's Aaron Couch and Graeme McMillan are viciously arguing over having a friendly debate about a hot topic in the world of geekdom — and inviting you to join.

This week, we're getting a jump on next week's 50th anniversary of Star Trek by addressing the elephant in the starship: Just who is the best captain of the franchise? For reasons of sanity, we've limited it to the onscreen captains of each of the main series in the franchise (Otherwise, it'd definitely be Mackenzie Calhoun , of course), so we're picking from Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway and Archer ... which, for some, makes it no contest at all.

Graeme McMillan: The great thing about choosing the best Star Trek captain is that there are certain choices you can just ignore immediately. I mean, sure; Voyager 's Janeway and Enterprise 's Archer almost certainly have their boosters, but would even those fans really make the case that they're better than, say, Kirk or Picard or Sisko … ? Wait. This is when you tell me that you're going to be arguing in favor of Janeway, isn't it?

Aaron Couch: Thanks a lot, Graeme. Now I'm feeling a lot of anxiety. Because we're about to commit a Star Trek Cardinal Sin ... by not including Kirk in this debate. I'm going for Picard. As wrong as it feels not to have Kirk in this conversation, my heart has always been with Picard. Picard is the ultimate Starfleet officer — a diplomat, scholar, philosopher, adventurer and basically the guy that makes everyone else look terrible by being so awesome. (I'd kill to be a science officer on the Enterprise, but that's not even close to being ambitious enough for Jean-Luc .)

Couch: I'm glad you brought the Cardassians, Graeme, because I have four words for you: THERE ARE FOUR LIGHTS . And one other thing I'd like to bring up: Picard is responsible for the death of Sisko's wife, who died during the Battle of Wolf 359. When Picard and Sisko meet in the DS9 premiere, Picard is shaken — but does not cower in shame — when Sisko brings up the fact that they've met in battle. Picard, always unflappable, does his duty, going as far as pressing Sisko to make sure he is right for the job. 

McMillan: Fine, you've forced me to bring out the big gun, and my final argument in favor of Sisko: He's the only captain that gets to level up his appearance throughout his series. Yes, Picard gets to move into a cardigan look, and Kirk adopts a laid-back sweater thing, but Sisko has them all beat. Going from the casual, clean-shaven-with-hair look to his hardcore bald-with-beard styling? Show me another captain who can beat that .


Amazon.com: Starship Blackbeard eBook: Michael Wallace.

Starship Blackbeard Audiobooks - Listen to the Full Series.

    A beard was a growth of facial hair that was common among humanoids . In numerous species, such as Humans , the growth of facial hair was a secondary sexual characteristic of the male of the species. Not all males allowed their beards to grow, and
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