Starship captains and their ships


Space is an unforgiving medium. Out there, in the tractless depths, the slightest mistake can be fatal for everybody. And that goes a hundredfold for mistakes by commanding officers. A single mistake can mean the death of hundreds, if not millions, of people. And there are plenty of commanders and captains who've failed, dramatically, when they tried to sit in the Big Chair.

In the first season of Farscape , Crais makes tons of questionable decisions, seeking to avenge his brother's death — notably chasing Moya all over space and ignoring orders. To quote from one forum post at Speculative Friction , "can we imagine a U.S. Aircraft carrier or Battleship commander witnessing his brother's death, then ordering his ship to race off across the Pacific, the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic, in pursuit of revenge against the killer? Of course not. It is stupid." Adds Madeline Ashby , "His pursuit of his brother's killer ends in both career and personal suicide."

He was sent on a mission to survey the Minbari forces but not to engage them. But when he saw a Minbari ship approaching with its gunports open, he lost his shit and decided to launch an all-out attack. The resulting devastation caused the Earth-Minbari war, leading to countless casualties. He's sort of synonymous with lethal levels of stupid.

Does Vader have to force-choke a bitch? Yes. Yes, he does. The catalogue of Ozzel and Needa's mistakes in Empire Strikes Back is fairly legendary — among other things, the Imperial Fleet drops out of hyperspace too close to Hoth, alerting the Rebels to the Imperial attack too soon and losing the element of surprise. Later, Needa lets Han Solo lead him a merry chase, and falls prey to a slew of old smuggler's tricks, most of which rely on Needa to miss the obvious.

His name basically says it all. He's a feckless young guy who doesn't really have any particular ambitions, military or otherwise. He joins the United Planets Space Force because he thinks it'll provide a cushy existence, maybe with a nice desk job somewhere. But then when war breaks out and he accidentally helps to save some hostages, he gets given the command of his own ship, the Soyokaze. But he's not interested in keeping order or discipline on his own ship — much like Captain E.O. — and he basically just survives due to pure dumb luck.

And finally, there's the guy who embodies courage, fearless leadership and wise command decisions. Zapp Brannigan basically belongs to the "cannon fodder" school of tactics — his approach to any situation is just to throw expendable people at it until the bodies pile up so high the enemy gets confused. He's been known to try and clog the enemy's death cannons with the wreckage of his own ships. He's sort of a parody of Captain Kirk, among other swaggering "ladies man" captains — but he's actually more like the various stupid captains whose messes Kirk had to clean up.

Starship Command is a persistent-world, massively single-player, real-time tactical starship simulator wrapped in an AI-driven 4X game. Starting with a lowly shuttle, you will trade and battle your way to victory, amassing a gigantic fleet customized to your liking!

Massively Single-Player means when you start Starship Command the first time, it will generate a galaxy with hundreds of sectors, each with their own planets and economies. Then populate the galaxy with seven AI-controlled empires that will attempt to conquer every sector. The galaxy persists through every captain you play as. And you can swap between multiple captains and play both sides of a conflict.

Take command of a starship! (or a fleet of starships). Build a fortune by trading commodities, completing missions, collecting taxes from sectors and battle the other empires for glory!

The highest ranking in the enlisted branch, the Master Chief (MCPO) has served with distinction for many years. A handful of master chiefs serve within Starfleet, all acknowledged leaders in their fields and commanding the respect of those beneath them. Such NCOs oversee important departments and can enjoy treatment almost like that of a distinguished officer. [There is only one Master Chief Petty Officer of Starfleet (MCPO/SF) (E9A) with specialized duties at Starfleet Headquarters.]

Space is an unforgiving medium. Out there, in the tractless depths, the slightest mistake can be fatal for everybody. And that goes a hundredfold for mistakes by commanding officers. A single mistake can mean the death of hundreds, if not millions, of people. And there are plenty of commanders and captains who've failed, dramatically, when they tried to sit in the Big Chair.

In the first season of Farscape , Crais makes tons of questionable decisions, seeking to avenge his brother's death — notably chasing Moya all over space and ignoring orders. To quote from one forum post at Speculative Friction , "can we imagine a U.S. Aircraft carrier or Battleship commander witnessing his brother's death, then ordering his ship to race off across the Pacific, the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic, in pursuit of revenge against the killer? Of course not. It is stupid." Adds Madeline Ashby , "His pursuit of his brother's killer ends in both career and personal suicide."

He was sent on a mission to survey the Minbari forces but not to engage them. But when he saw a Minbari ship approaching with its gunports open, he lost his shit and decided to launch an all-out attack. The resulting devastation caused the Earth-Minbari war, leading to countless casualties. He's sort of synonymous with lethal levels of stupid.

Does Vader have to force-choke a bitch? Yes. Yes, he does. The catalogue of Ozzel and Needa's mistakes in Empire Strikes Back is fairly legendary — among other things, the Imperial Fleet drops out of hyperspace too close to Hoth, alerting the Rebels to the Imperial attack too soon and losing the element of surprise. Later, Needa lets Han Solo lead him a merry chase, and falls prey to a slew of old smuggler's tricks, most of which rely on Needa to miss the obvious.

His name basically says it all. He's a feckless young guy who doesn't really have any particular ambitions, military or otherwise. He joins the United Planets Space Force because he thinks it'll provide a cushy existence, maybe with a nice desk job somewhere. But then when war breaks out and he accidentally helps to save some hostages, he gets given the command of his own ship, the Soyokaze. But he's not interested in keeping order or discipline on his own ship — much like Captain E.O. — and he basically just survives due to pure dumb luck.

And finally, there's the guy who embodies courage, fearless leadership and wise command decisions. Zapp Brannigan basically belongs to the "cannon fodder" school of tactics — his approach to any situation is just to throw expendable people at it until the bodies pile up so high the enemy gets confused. He's been known to try and clog the enemy's death cannons with the wreckage of his own ships. He's sort of a parody of Captain Kirk, among other swaggering "ladies man" captains — but he's actually more like the various stupid captains whose messes Kirk had to clean up.

Space is an unforgiving medium. Out there, in the tractless depths, the slightest mistake can be fatal for everybody. And that goes a hundredfold for mistakes by commanding officers. A single mistake can mean the death of hundreds, if not millions, of people. And there are plenty of commanders and captains who've failed, dramatically, when they tried to sit in the Big Chair.

In the first season of Farscape , Crais makes tons of questionable decisions, seeking to avenge his brother's death — notably chasing Moya all over space and ignoring orders. To quote from one forum post at Speculative Friction , "can we imagine a U.S. Aircraft carrier or Battleship commander witnessing his brother's death, then ordering his ship to race off across the Pacific, the Indian Ocean, the Atlantic, in pursuit of revenge against the killer? Of course not. It is stupid." Adds Madeline Ashby , "His pursuit of his brother's killer ends in both career and personal suicide."

He was sent on a mission to survey the Minbari forces but not to engage them. But when he saw a Minbari ship approaching with its gunports open, he lost his shit and decided to launch an all-out attack. The resulting devastation caused the Earth-Minbari war, leading to countless casualties. He's sort of synonymous with lethal levels of stupid.

Does Vader have to force-choke a bitch? Yes. Yes, he does. The catalogue of Ozzel and Needa's mistakes in Empire Strikes Back is fairly legendary — among other things, the Imperial Fleet drops out of hyperspace too close to Hoth, alerting the Rebels to the Imperial attack too soon and losing the element of surprise. Later, Needa lets Han Solo lead him a merry chase, and falls prey to a slew of old smuggler's tricks, most of which rely on Needa to miss the obvious.

His name basically says it all. He's a feckless young guy who doesn't really have any particular ambitions, military or otherwise. He joins the United Planets Space Force because he thinks it'll provide a cushy existence, maybe with a nice desk job somewhere. But then when war breaks out and he accidentally helps to save some hostages, he gets given the command of his own ship, the Soyokaze. But he's not interested in keeping order or discipline on his own ship — much like Captain E.O. — and he basically just survives due to pure dumb luck.

And finally, there's the guy who embodies courage, fearless leadership and wise command decisions. Zapp Brannigan basically belongs to the "cannon fodder" school of tactics — his approach to any situation is just to throw expendable people at it until the bodies pile up so high the enemy gets confused. He's been known to try and clog the enemy's death cannons with the wreckage of his own ships. He's sort of a parody of Captain Kirk, among other swaggering "ladies man" captains — but he's actually more like the various stupid captains whose messes Kirk had to clean up.

Starship Command is a persistent-world, massively single-player, real-time tactical starship simulator wrapped in an AI-driven 4X game. Starting with a lowly shuttle, you will trade and battle your way to victory, amassing a gigantic fleet customized to your liking!

Massively Single-Player means when you start Starship Command the first time, it will generate a galaxy with hundreds of sectors, each with their own planets and economies. Then populate the galaxy with seven AI-controlled empires that will attempt to conquer every sector. The galaxy persists through every captain you play as. And you can swap between multiple captains and play both sides of a conflict.

Take command of a starship! (or a fleet of starships). Build a fortune by trading commodities, completing missions, collecting taxes from sectors and battle the other empires for glory!


Starfleet captains | Memory Beta, non-canon Star Trek Wiki.

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    Space is an unforgiving medium. Out there, in the tractless depths, the slightest mistake can be fatal for everybody. And that goes a hundredfold for mistakes by commanding officers. A single mistake can mean the death of hundreds, if not millions, of
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