Kindergarten lessons for church sunday schools: a manual for the instruction of beginners (classic re


 We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .

Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?

 Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First, we did some visualizing!

This is a sweet picture that one of our kindergarten friends sent in.  I love how she turned the craft into a reading response journal using our unit. Such a great way to add purpose to a craft!

Snow is Falling is also a great informational text. You can find our Guiding Readers lesson plans for this book HERE.

We also worked on making a snowball catapult!  You can find the directions and response pages for this activity by clicking HERE.

Kindergarten students are adventurous and intuitive. They accept the world the way it is and have a hard time isolating specific information from a larger pool. They don't categorize objects logically. When drawing, kindergartners do not use realistic proportion. They draw things that are important to them in large scale, and might exclude things that are not important to them. Rather than drawing what they see visually, they tend to draw what they know about the person or object they are drawing.

Effective lessons for students at this age are short and repetitive. Repetition is particularly important in kindergarten because it encourages students to experiment and gives them time to develop awareness.

Perceptual development is intense at this age, and experiences that stimulate multiple senses such as sound, touch, and smell work particularly well.

Suggestions for Discussion
Have students engage in exercises to identify the elements of art. For example, a guided-looking activity could focus on the elements of color, shape, and line. Asking questions that call on students to compare things that are alike and different is also effective at this grade level.

Suggestions for Art Production
Encourage intuition and spontaneous expression by providing a variety of materials. This allows for free expression of ideas and space. For example, in one activity you can give students access to different types of paint (watercolors, poster paint, tempera), crayons, pens, pencils, and papers of various colors and sizes to give them choices and experience with wet, dry, opaque, and transparent media.

Two-dimensional production:
Large-sized paper and large brushes allow these students, who are still developing fine motor skills, to make big gestures. Students can use paint to explore color and color mixing. Develop students' abilities to recognize the names of art tools and describe their functions.

 We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .

Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?

 Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First, we did some visualizing!

This is a sweet picture that one of our kindergarten friends sent in.  I love how she turned the craft into a reading response journal using our unit. Such a great way to add purpose to a craft!

Snow is Falling is also a great informational text. You can find our Guiding Readers lesson plans for this book HERE.

We also worked on making a snowball catapult!  You can find the directions and response pages for this activity by clicking HERE.

Kindergarten students are adventurous and intuitive. They accept the world the way it is and have a hard time isolating specific information from a larger pool. They don't categorize objects logically. When drawing, kindergartners do not use realistic proportion. They draw things that are important to them in large scale, and might exclude things that are not important to them. Rather than drawing what they see visually, they tend to draw what they know about the person or object they are drawing.

Effective lessons for students at this age are short and repetitive. Repetition is particularly important in kindergarten because it encourages students to experiment and gives them time to develop awareness.

Perceptual development is intense at this age, and experiences that stimulate multiple senses such as sound, touch, and smell work particularly well.

Suggestions for Discussion
Have students engage in exercises to identify the elements of art. For example, a guided-looking activity could focus on the elements of color, shape, and line. Asking questions that call on students to compare things that are alike and different is also effective at this grade level.

Suggestions for Art Production
Encourage intuition and spontaneous expression by providing a variety of materials. This allows for free expression of ideas and space. For example, in one activity you can give students access to different types of paint (watercolors, poster paint, tempera), crayons, pens, pencils, and papers of various colors and sizes to give them choices and experience with wet, dry, opaque, and transparent media.

Two-dimensional production:
Large-sized paper and large brushes allow these students, who are still developing fine motor skills, to make big gestures. Students can use paint to explore color and color mixing. Develop students' abilities to recognize the names of art tools and describe their functions.

Just about all the  themes  work great in kindergarten. Even conceptually difficult ones like “countries” or “telling the time” work great.   90% of the others work even better in kindergarten than they do in elementary school!

Many of the games on the main “ Games Page ” work very well in kindergarten, and indeed many of them were first developed there.

The ideas on this page have been specially selected for use with younger beginners. But here are a few tips to help you out:

If at first you don’t succeed:  All these games work great in Kindergarten, that’s the only criteria for them being selected. But if at first you don’t succeed, change it a bit and try it next time!

Keep it short : Don’t plan a 20 minute game. If kids are wondering off, let them! Keep going with the kids that are interested and the others may come back.

Under control:  If the kids start getting out of control, well they’re kids so don’t expect them to sit still! But if you want to tire them out a bit, then do lots of “stand ups”, “jumps” etc. see the  Warm Up Game

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

 We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .

Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?

 Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First, we did some visualizing!

This is a sweet picture that one of our kindergarten friends sent in.  I love how she turned the craft into a reading response journal using our unit. Such a great way to add purpose to a craft!

Snow is Falling is also a great informational text. You can find our Guiding Readers lesson plans for this book HERE.

We also worked on making a snowball catapult!  You can find the directions and response pages for this activity by clicking HERE.

Kindergarten students are adventurous and intuitive. They accept the world the way it is and have a hard time isolating specific information from a larger pool. They don't categorize objects logically. When drawing, kindergartners do not use realistic proportion. They draw things that are important to them in large scale, and might exclude things that are not important to them. Rather than drawing what they see visually, they tend to draw what they know about the person or object they are drawing.

Effective lessons for students at this age are short and repetitive. Repetition is particularly important in kindergarten because it encourages students to experiment and gives them time to develop awareness.

Perceptual development is intense at this age, and experiences that stimulate multiple senses such as sound, touch, and smell work particularly well.

Suggestions for Discussion
Have students engage in exercises to identify the elements of art. For example, a guided-looking activity could focus on the elements of color, shape, and line. Asking questions that call on students to compare things that are alike and different is also effective at this grade level.

Suggestions for Art Production
Encourage intuition and spontaneous expression by providing a variety of materials. This allows for free expression of ideas and space. For example, in one activity you can give students access to different types of paint (watercolors, poster paint, tempera), crayons, pens, pencils, and papers of various colors and sizes to give them choices and experience with wet, dry, opaque, and transparent media.

Two-dimensional production:
Large-sized paper and large brushes allow these students, who are still developing fine motor skills, to make big gestures. Students can use paint to explore color and color mixing. Develop students' abilities to recognize the names of art tools and describe their functions.

Just about all the  themes  work great in kindergarten. Even conceptually difficult ones like “countries” or “telling the time” work great.   90% of the others work even better in kindergarten than they do in elementary school!

Many of the games on the main “ Games Page ” work very well in kindergarten, and indeed many of them were first developed there.

The ideas on this page have been specially selected for use with younger beginners. But here are a few tips to help you out:

If at first you don’t succeed:  All these games work great in Kindergarten, that’s the only criteria for them being selected. But if at first you don’t succeed, change it a bit and try it next time!

Keep it short : Don’t plan a 20 minute game. If kids are wondering off, let them! Keep going with the kids that are interested and the others may come back.

Under control:  If the kids start getting out of control, well they’re kids so don’t expect them to sit still! But if you want to tire them out a bit, then do lots of “stand ups”, “jumps” etc. see the  Warm Up Game

 We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .

Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?

 Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First, we did some visualizing!

This is a sweet picture that one of our kindergarten friends sent in.  I love how she turned the craft into a reading response journal using our unit. Such a great way to add purpose to a craft!

Snow is Falling is also a great informational text. You can find our Guiding Readers lesson plans for this book HERE.

We also worked on making a snowball catapult!  You can find the directions and response pages for this activity by clicking HERE.

 We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .

Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?

 Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First, we did some visualizing!

This is a sweet picture that one of our kindergarten friends sent in.  I love how she turned the craft into a reading response journal using our unit. Such a great way to add purpose to a craft!

Snow is Falling is also a great informational text. You can find our Guiding Readers lesson plans for this book HERE.

We also worked on making a snowball catapult!  You can find the directions and response pages for this activity by clicking HERE.

Kindergarten students are adventurous and intuitive. They accept the world the way it is and have a hard time isolating specific information from a larger pool. They don't categorize objects logically. When drawing, kindergartners do not use realistic proportion. They draw things that are important to them in large scale, and might exclude things that are not important to them. Rather than drawing what they see visually, they tend to draw what they know about the person or object they are drawing.

Effective lessons for students at this age are short and repetitive. Repetition is particularly important in kindergarten because it encourages students to experiment and gives them time to develop awareness.

Perceptual development is intense at this age, and experiences that stimulate multiple senses such as sound, touch, and smell work particularly well.

Suggestions for Discussion
Have students engage in exercises to identify the elements of art. For example, a guided-looking activity could focus on the elements of color, shape, and line. Asking questions that call on students to compare things that are alike and different is also effective at this grade level.

Suggestions for Art Production
Encourage intuition and spontaneous expression by providing a variety of materials. This allows for free expression of ideas and space. For example, in one activity you can give students access to different types of paint (watercolors, poster paint, tempera), crayons, pens, pencils, and papers of various colors and sizes to give them choices and experience with wet, dry, opaque, and transparent media.

Two-dimensional production:
Large-sized paper and large brushes allow these students, who are still developing fine motor skills, to make big gestures. Students can use paint to explore color and color mixing. Develop students' abilities to recognize the names of art tools and describe their functions.

Just about all the  themes  work great in kindergarten. Even conceptually difficult ones like “countries” or “telling the time” work great.   90% of the others work even better in kindergarten than they do in elementary school!

Many of the games on the main “ Games Page ” work very well in kindergarten, and indeed many of them were first developed there.

The ideas on this page have been specially selected for use with younger beginners. But here are a few tips to help you out:

If at first you don’t succeed:  All these games work great in Kindergarten, that’s the only criteria for them being selected. But if at first you don’t succeed, change it a bit and try it next time!

Keep it short : Don’t plan a 20 minute game. If kids are wondering off, let them! Keep going with the kids that are interested and the others may come back.

Under control:  If the kids start getting out of control, well they’re kids so don’t expect them to sit still! But if you want to tire them out a bit, then do lots of “stand ups”, “jumps” etc. see the  Warm Up Game

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

If you are a preschool or kindergarten teacher, the most important lessons you are going to teach your students are going to be about the alphabet. Teaching the alphabet in preschool and kindergarten involves teaching students to write letters, identify letters, and associate letters with sounds.

This lesson will follow the plans of a kindergarten teacher, Mrs. Matthews, which will incorporate all three aspects of teaching the alphabet. The activities detailed in this lesson can be adjusted to be appropriate for younger students, such as those in preschool.

In her kindergarten classroom, Mrs. Matthews likes to frame her alphabet lessons with a letter of the week. In this routine, the beginning of new week of school means that students will be introduced to and learn all about a brand new letter. The letter of the week helps frame all of Mrs. Matthews activities around a single letter. The activities mentioned in this lesson can all be fit into the letter of the week framework.

In Mrs. Matthews' classroom, learning to write letters comes down to repeated practice. Students spend a lot of time throughout the week practicing writing their new letter of the week. For example, Mrs. Matthews has small, individual whiteboards on which students can practice their letters, erase, and try again.

There are many other ways to have students practice writing letters. One creative way is to have individual plates of colored sand into which students should practice writing letters with their fingers. This gives the student tactile experience with the letters. It also helps students who might still be struggling to hold a pencil or crayon practice writing the letters.

After Mrs. Matthews has introduced the new letter of the week to her students, many of her lessons are focused on helping students identify the letters in isolation, in words, and in sentences. It is important to give students ample experience seeing letters in different environments, as this skill will eventually lead them to learning to read.


Kindergarten Lessons - Involve me and I learn.

Free Kindergarten Lesson Plans – Online Lesson Plans for.

     We love The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats .  You can find our Guiding Readers Lesson Plans for this book HERE .Did you know that Amazon has a video for this book?  Here are some of the activities for The Snowy Day.  First,
51BGSWs21cL