The battle of distant times: the beginning of the end has begun... (project powers of the universe) (



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The Four Days' Battle was a naval battle of the Second Anglo–Dutch War . Fought from 1 June to 4 June 1666 in the Julian or Old Style calendar then used in England (11 June to 14 June New Style ) off the Flemish and English coast, it remains one of the longest naval engagements in history.

The Dutch inflicted significant damage on the English fleet. The English had gambled that the crews of the many new Dutch ships of the line would not have been fully trained yet but were deceived in their hopes: they lost ten ships in total, with around 1,500 men killed including two Vice-Admirals, Sir Christopher Myngs and Sir William Berkeley , while about 2000 English were taken prisoner. Dutch losses were four ships destroyed by fire and over 1,550 men killed, including Lieut-Admiral Cornelis Evertsen , Vice-Admiral Abraham van der Hulst and Rear-Admiral Frederik Stachouwer .

In June 1665 the English had soundly defeated the Dutch in the Battle of Lowestoft , but failed to take advantage of it. The Dutch Spice Fleet, loaded with fabulous riches, managed to return home safely after the Battle of Vågen . The Dutch navy was enormously expanded through the largest building programme in its history. In August 1665 already the English fleet was again challenged, though no large battles resulted. In 1666, the English became anxious to destroy the Dutch navy completely before it could grow too strong and were desperate to end the activity of Dutch raiders as a collapse of English trade threatened.

On learning that the French fleet intended to join the Dutch at Dunkirk , the English decided to prevent this by splitting their fleet. Their main force would try to destroy the Dutch fleet first, while a squadron under Prince Rupert was sent to block the Strait of Dover against the French – who did not appear.

At the start of the battle the English fleet of 56 ships commanded by George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle who also commanded the Red Squadron, was outnumbered by the 84-strong Dutch fleet commanded by Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter . The battle ended with an English flight into a fog bank after both fleets had expended most of their ammunition.

Both fleets bombarded each other in a line of battle. The Hof van Zeeland and the Duivenvoorde were hit by fire shot and burnt. The Dutch didn't know of the existence of this type of ammunition, consisting of hollow brass balls filled with a flammable substance, so they were greatly surprised. Luckily for them the English had only a small supply because of the high cost of production.

We were unable to find any bookstore that carried this item. You can search by title or author at ABEBooks for editions that may lack an ISBN.


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StormPowered is a Pending Trademark of Albireo Studios, LLC All Rights Reserved.
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©Storm Eagle Studios - 2011, a division of Albireo Studios, L.L.C.
StormPowered is a Pending Trademark of Albireo Studios, LLC All Rights Reserved.
All trademarks displayed on this site are the property of their respective owners worldwide.
Privacy Policy

The Four Days' Battle was a naval battle of the Second Anglo–Dutch War . Fought from 1 June to 4 June 1666 in the Julian or Old Style calendar then used in England (11 June to 14 June New Style ) off the Flemish and English coast, it remains one of the longest naval engagements in history.

The Dutch inflicted significant damage on the English fleet. The English had gambled that the crews of the many new Dutch ships of the line would not have been fully trained yet but were deceived in their hopes: they lost ten ships in total, with around 1,500 men killed including two Vice-Admirals, Sir Christopher Myngs and Sir William Berkeley , while about 2000 English were taken prisoner. Dutch losses were four ships destroyed by fire and over 1,550 men killed, including Lieut-Admiral Cornelis Evertsen , Vice-Admiral Abraham van der Hulst and Rear-Admiral Frederik Stachouwer .

In June 1665 the English had soundly defeated the Dutch in the Battle of Lowestoft , but failed to take advantage of it. The Dutch Spice Fleet, loaded with fabulous riches, managed to return home safely after the Battle of Vågen . The Dutch navy was enormously expanded through the largest building programme in its history. In August 1665 already the English fleet was again challenged, though no large battles resulted. In 1666, the English became anxious to destroy the Dutch navy completely before it could grow too strong and were desperate to end the activity of Dutch raiders as a collapse of English trade threatened.

On learning that the French fleet intended to join the Dutch at Dunkirk , the English decided to prevent this by splitting their fleet. Their main force would try to destroy the Dutch fleet first, while a squadron under Prince Rupert was sent to block the Strait of Dover against the French – who did not appear.

At the start of the battle the English fleet of 56 ships commanded by George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle who also commanded the Red Squadron, was outnumbered by the 84-strong Dutch fleet commanded by Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter . The battle ended with an English flight into a fog bank after both fleets had expended most of their ammunition.

Both fleets bombarded each other in a line of battle. The Hof van Zeeland and the Duivenvoorde were hit by fire shot and burnt. The Dutch didn't know of the existence of this type of ammunition, consisting of hollow brass balls filled with a flammable substance, so they were greatly surprised. Luckily for them the English had only a small supply because of the high cost of production.


©Storm Eagle Studios - 2011, a division of Albireo Studios, L.L.C.
StormPowered is a Pending Trademark of Albireo Studios, LLC All Rights Reserved.
All trademarks displayed on this site are the property of their respective owners worldwide.
Privacy Policy

The Four Days' Battle was a naval battle of the Second Anglo–Dutch War . Fought from 1 June to 4 June 1666 in the Julian or Old Style calendar then used in England (11 June to 14 June New Style ) off the Flemish and English coast, it remains one of the longest naval engagements in history.

The Dutch inflicted significant damage on the English fleet. The English had gambled that the crews of the many new Dutch ships of the line would not have been fully trained yet but were deceived in their hopes: they lost ten ships in total, with around 1,500 men killed including two Vice-Admirals, Sir Christopher Myngs and Sir William Berkeley , while about 2000 English were taken prisoner. Dutch losses were four ships destroyed by fire and over 1,550 men killed, including Lieut-Admiral Cornelis Evertsen , Vice-Admiral Abraham van der Hulst and Rear-Admiral Frederik Stachouwer .

In June 1665 the English had soundly defeated the Dutch in the Battle of Lowestoft , but failed to take advantage of it. The Dutch Spice Fleet, loaded with fabulous riches, managed to return home safely after the Battle of Vågen . The Dutch navy was enormously expanded through the largest building programme in its history. In August 1665 already the English fleet was again challenged, though no large battles resulted. In 1666, the English became anxious to destroy the Dutch navy completely before it could grow too strong and were desperate to end the activity of Dutch raiders as a collapse of English trade threatened.

On learning that the French fleet intended to join the Dutch at Dunkirk , the English decided to prevent this by splitting their fleet. Their main force would try to destroy the Dutch fleet first, while a squadron under Prince Rupert was sent to block the Strait of Dover against the French – who did not appear.

At the start of the battle the English fleet of 56 ships commanded by George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle who also commanded the Red Squadron, was outnumbered by the 84-strong Dutch fleet commanded by Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter . The battle ended with an English flight into a fog bank after both fleets had expended most of their ammunition.

Both fleets bombarded each other in a line of battle. The Hof van Zeeland and the Duivenvoorde were hit by fire shot and burnt. The Dutch didn't know of the existence of this type of ammunition, consisting of hollow brass balls filled with a flammable substance, so they were greatly surprised. Luckily for them the English had only a small supply because of the high cost of production.

We were unable to find any bookstore that carried this item. You can search by title or author at ABEBooks for editions that may lack an ISBN.

The OVA premièred in Japan in February 2002 in an advanced screening. It was followed by two DVD releases on April 19 and October 6, 2002. ADV Films licensed the OVA for release in North American and the United Kingdom, Madman Entertainment licensed it for Australasia and Anime Limited, for the United Kingdom. In 2002, it won the Animation Kobe award for packaged work. It also won the 2003 Seiun Award for Best Media. It was very positively received by critics, who praised its artistic dimension, plot, and music; the English-language version, however was criticized for its dubbing.

The OVA was adapted into a drama CD by Pioneer LDC and a novel was written by Waku Ōba, illustrated by Makoto Shinkai and Kou Yaginuma , and published by Media Factory 's imprint MF Bunko J . Makoto Shinkai adapted a manga from the OVA, illustrated by Mizu Sahara ; Kodansha serialized it in its manga magazine, Afternoon , from April 2004, and released the manga as a one-shot on February 23, 2005. The manga was licensed for a North American release by Tokyopop , which published it on August 1, 2006.

The ship's alarm warns Mikako that the Tarsians are surrounding her, but she does not understand. A climactic battle ensues. On Earth, Noboru receives the message almost nine years later. At Agartha, three of the four carriers equipped with the warp engines which brought the expeditionary force to Sirius have been destroyed. The Lysithea is still intact after Mikako joins the fight and stops its destruction. After winning the battle, Mikako lets her damaged Tracer drift in space.

In the manga, at 16 years old, Mikako sends a message to 25 years old Noboru, telling him that she loves him. By this time, Noboru has joined the UN, which has launched a rescue mission for the Lysithea. When Mikako hears that the UN is sending help for their rescue, she consults a list of people on the mission, and finds that Noboru is among them. The manga ends with Mikako saying that they will definitely meet again.

Voices of a Distant Star was written, directed and produced by Makoto Shinkai on his Power Mac G4 using LightWave , Adobe Photoshop 5.0 , Adobe After Effects 4.1 and Commotion 3.1 DV software. [1] [3] Around June 2000, Shinkai drew the first picture for Voices —of a girl holding a mobile telephone in a cockpit. [4]

Shinkai said the OVA was inspired by Dracula and Laputa . [5] He stated that production took seven months to complete. [6] He said another inspiration was his frequent sending of text messaging to his wife when he was working. [1] Shinkai cited the availability of digital hardware and software tools for image production at his workplace, Falcom , and friends' view that individual film production could occur because of the introduction of PlayStation 2 and DVDs . [7]


Smashwords – The Battle of Distant Times – a book by Ethan.

Four Days Battle - Wikipedia

    ©Storm Eagle Studios - 2011, a division of Albireo Studios, L.L.C. StormPowered is a Pending Trademark of Albireo Studios, LLC All Rights Reserved. All trademarks displayed on this site are the property of their respective owners
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