Criminal law and procedure


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The School of Law offers a unique and varied curriculum for students interested in practicing in the field of criminal law. KU Law students have the opportunity to delve into constitutional and statutory criminal law, explore procedural and substantive issues, learn state and federal law, and gain hands-on experience in the trial and appellate arenas. By taking advantage of the wide selection of courses and clinics, students will be fully equipped to prosecute or defend criminal cases in state or federal court.

In their first year of law school, all students are required to take Criminal Law . Criminal Law provides students with a basic understanding of the elements of various crimes, theories of culpability, and theories of defense. Upon completion of the first year of law school, each student has a strong foundation in criminal law upon which to build greater expertise.

For second- and third-year students who choose to expand their knowledge of criminal law issues, the KU law school offers a variety of opportunities, both in the classroom and in clinical settings:

KU Law students have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to actual criminal proceedings by participating in a number of clinical and field placement programs.

Students in the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies represent inmates incarcerated in state and federal institutions in habeas corpus and appellate proceedings.

This website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to our cookies policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Read more

Criminal Law and Philosophy fills a gap in the scholarly literature by providing a platform for articles that take a philosophical perspective on any issue in the broad field of crime and punishment. It gives readers access to the latest thinking by the field’s best scholars.

Topics addressed include crime and criminalization; the content, principles, and structure of substantive criminal law; criminal justice and the criminal process; and punishment and sentencing.

Contributions from a range of philosophical schools and approaches are encouraged, in particular from both analytically oriented philosophers and from those who draw more from contemporary continental philosophy. The journal also publishes articles with an historical focus on earlier philosophical discussions of crime and punishment as well as articles with a more contemporary focus.

Related subjects » Criminal Law and Criminology - Ethics - Law - Philosophy of Law

SCOPUS, Google Scholar, EBSCO Legal, Criminal Justice Periodical Index, Current Abstracts, Current Law Index, EBSCO Book Review Digest Plus (H.W. Wilson) , EBSCO Criminal Justice Abstracts, EBSCO Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO OmniFile Full Text (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index, ERIH PLUS, OCLC, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Social Science Collection, SCImago, Summon by ProQuest, The Philosopher's Index

Advising | Catalog | Tutors
Writing Center | Math help room
Finals Schedule | GPA Calculator

The School of Law offers a unique and varied curriculum for students interested in practicing in the field of criminal law. KU Law students have the opportunity to delve into constitutional and statutory criminal law, explore procedural and substantive issues, learn state and federal law, and gain hands-on experience in the trial and appellate arenas. By taking advantage of the wide selection of courses and clinics, students will be fully equipped to prosecute or defend criminal cases in state or federal court.

In their first year of law school, all students are required to take Criminal Law . Criminal Law provides students with a basic understanding of the elements of various crimes, theories of culpability, and theories of defense. Upon completion of the first year of law school, each student has a strong foundation in criminal law upon which to build greater expertise.

For second- and third-year students who choose to expand their knowledge of criminal law issues, the KU law school offers a variety of opportunities, both in the classroom and in clinical settings:

KU Law students have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to actual criminal proceedings by participating in a number of clinical and field placement programs.

Students in the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies represent inmates incarcerated in state and federal institutions in habeas corpus and appellate proceedings.

Advising | Catalog | Tutors
Writing Center | Math help room
Finals Schedule | GPA Calculator

The School of Law offers a unique and varied curriculum for students interested in practicing in the field of criminal law. KU Law students have the opportunity to delve into constitutional and statutory criminal law, explore procedural and substantive issues, learn state and federal law, and gain hands-on experience in the trial and appellate arenas. By taking advantage of the wide selection of courses and clinics, students will be fully equipped to prosecute or defend criminal cases in state or federal court.

In their first year of law school, all students are required to take Criminal Law . Criminal Law provides students with a basic understanding of the elements of various crimes, theories of culpability, and theories of defense. Upon completion of the first year of law school, each student has a strong foundation in criminal law upon which to build greater expertise.

For second- and third-year students who choose to expand their knowledge of criminal law issues, the KU law school offers a variety of opportunities, both in the classroom and in clinical settings:

KU Law students have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to actual criminal proceedings by participating in a number of clinical and field placement programs.

Students in the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies represent inmates incarcerated in state and federal institutions in habeas corpus and appellate proceedings.

This website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to our cookies policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Read more

Criminal Law and Philosophy fills a gap in the scholarly literature by providing a platform for articles that take a philosophical perspective on any issue in the broad field of crime and punishment. It gives readers access to the latest thinking by the field’s best scholars.

Topics addressed include crime and criminalization; the content, principles, and structure of substantive criminal law; criminal justice and the criminal process; and punishment and sentencing.

Contributions from a range of philosophical schools and approaches are encouraged, in particular from both analytically oriented philosophers and from those who draw more from contemporary continental philosophy. The journal also publishes articles with an historical focus on earlier philosophical discussions of crime and punishment as well as articles with a more contemporary focus.

Related subjects » Criminal Law and Criminology - Ethics - Law - Philosophy of Law

SCOPUS, Google Scholar, EBSCO Legal, Criminal Justice Periodical Index, Current Abstracts, Current Law Index, EBSCO Book Review Digest Plus (H.W. Wilson) , EBSCO Criminal Justice Abstracts, EBSCO Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO OmniFile Full Text (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index, ERIH PLUS, OCLC, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Social Science Collection, SCImago, Summon by ProQuest, The Philosopher's Index

In-depth discussion of common crimes and possible defenses. Explanation of defendants' constitutional rights, description of the process from arrest to trial and beyond, overview of  the juvenile justice system,  and more.

Advising | Catalog | Tutors
Writing Center | Math help room
Finals Schedule | GPA Calculator

The School of Law offers a unique and varied curriculum for students interested in practicing in the field of criminal law. KU Law students have the opportunity to delve into constitutional and statutory criminal law, explore procedural and substantive issues, learn state and federal law, and gain hands-on experience in the trial and appellate arenas. By taking advantage of the wide selection of courses and clinics, students will be fully equipped to prosecute or defend criminal cases in state or federal court.

In their first year of law school, all students are required to take Criminal Law . Criminal Law provides students with a basic understanding of the elements of various crimes, theories of culpability, and theories of defense. Upon completion of the first year of law school, each student has a strong foundation in criminal law upon which to build greater expertise.

For second- and third-year students who choose to expand their knowledge of criminal law issues, the KU law school offers a variety of opportunities, both in the classroom and in clinical settings:

KU Law students have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to actual criminal proceedings by participating in a number of clinical and field placement programs.

Students in the Project for Innocence and Post-Conviction Remedies represent inmates incarcerated in state and federal institutions in habeas corpus and appellate proceedings.

This website uses cookies. By using our website and agreeing to our cookies policy, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy. Read more

Criminal Law and Philosophy fills a gap in the scholarly literature by providing a platform for articles that take a philosophical perspective on any issue in the broad field of crime and punishment. It gives readers access to the latest thinking by the field’s best scholars.

Topics addressed include crime and criminalization; the content, principles, and structure of substantive criminal law; criminal justice and the criminal process; and punishment and sentencing.

Contributions from a range of philosophical schools and approaches are encouraged, in particular from both analytically oriented philosophers and from those who draw more from contemporary continental philosophy. The journal also publishes articles with an historical focus on earlier philosophical discussions of crime and punishment as well as articles with a more contemporary focus.

Related subjects » Criminal Law and Criminology - Ethics - Law - Philosophy of Law

SCOPUS, Google Scholar, EBSCO Legal, Criminal Justice Periodical Index, Current Abstracts, Current Law Index, EBSCO Book Review Digest Plus (H.W. Wilson) , EBSCO Criminal Justice Abstracts, EBSCO Index to Legal Periodicals and Books (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO OmniFile Full Text (H.W. Wilson), EBSCO TOC Premier, Emerging Sources Citation Index, ERIH PLUS, OCLC, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Social Science Collection, SCImago, Summon by ProQuest, The Philosopher's Index

In-depth discussion of common crimes and possible defenses. Explanation of defendants' constitutional rights, description of the process from arrest to trial and beyond, overview of  the juvenile justice system,  and more.

For uses beyond those covered by law or the Creative Commons license, permission to reuse should be sought directly from the copyright owner.


Criminal Law legal definition of Criminal Law

Criminal Law - FindLaw

    Advising | Catalog | Tutors Writing Center | Math help room Finals Schedule | GPA CalculatorThe School of Law offers a unique and varied curriculum for students interested in practicing in the field of criminal law. KU Law students
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