Ultimate cookery course video app 9


If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

H ere’s the scene. The Hai Van Pass, which crosses coastal mountains between Hue and Danang, forms a natural barrier across Vietnam’s tiny waist. Its strategic importance through centuries of conflict is signified by the various fortifications that mark the summit – including a concrete pillbox from the Vietnam War.

On my last visit to Vietnam, we stopped on the top of the pass to enjoy the stupendous views of jungle-clad mountains sloping to the misty ocean. I was taking pictures when I noticed a couple preparing to assault the pillbox. They weren’t in combat fatigues, however. They were bride and groom, she in a pink chiffon dress and high heels.

U sing a ladder, they clambered on to the circular roof of the pillbox and posed for a photographer standing below. It was a lovely vignette that said much about modern Vietnam: how far it has come in the 40 years since the end of a conflict that claimed millions of Vietnamese lives and obliterated infrastructure and landscape alike; how dynamic and optimistic its people have become.

When organised tourism from the West started in the Nineties the war was a focal point – the Cu Chi tunnels, in which the Viet Cong hid out, near Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) were a major draw. But the war is now a distant event for the Vietnamese, the majority of whom were born after hostilities ended.

When you arrive in the capital Hanoi, for example, I’m suggesting you head straight out of the city and into tranquil countryside to recover from the flight. Two days later, back in Hanoi, take a city tour with an experienced local guide who will show you the traditional sights, including the Temple of Literature.

From Hanoi the fantastical natural beauty of Halong Bay – karst limestone peaks rising from a shimmering sea – is a compulsory part of any trip.

An intensive four week residential course to teach culinary skills, and to inspire a love and passion for food and cooking. Ideal for any age, learn to cook for fun, for family and friends or professionally. Learn more > >

The One Week Wonder! The ultimate impact cookery course! Learn to cook the food that you'll love to eat. We'll teach you how to cook even if you are only able to join us for a week. Learn more > >

At our stylish, 200-year-old Carcassonne farmhouse, set in the stunning rural environment of South West France, we offer scheduled short-break tutored group holidays which you can join as an individual, or those which can be tailor-made for your own group during your selected dates.

We provide superior all-inclusive experience holidays, assuring the very best of personal attention to people whose expectations are high.

Without exception, our clients praise our great accommodation, fantastic food and wine, the excellence of our tutors and our exacting attention to detail.

Groups with no tutor requirements – or who are accompanied by their own instructor – can, with our help, create a bespoke break in the calm knowledge that it will run smoothly – we can arrange everything you need, from buses to banquets.

The French House Party is named Top Retreat in the National Geographic book by American travel writer Pam Grout: “The 100 Best Worldwide Vacations to Enrich Your Life”.

Cook in France! Join one of our Gastro Academy all-inclusive courses and you’ll have a top 4-star French chef as your tutor. Choose from 3-day, 6-day and 7-day courses. The cookery classes are conducted in English and French. These courses can accommodate non-participating partners who would like to have a golf programme arranged for them. Find out more »

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

H ere’s the scene. The Hai Van Pass, which crosses coastal mountains between Hue and Danang, forms a natural barrier across Vietnam’s tiny waist. Its strategic importance through centuries of conflict is signified by the various fortifications that mark the summit – including a concrete pillbox from the Vietnam War.

On my last visit to Vietnam, we stopped on the top of the pass to enjoy the stupendous views of jungle-clad mountains sloping to the misty ocean. I was taking pictures when I noticed a couple preparing to assault the pillbox. They weren’t in combat fatigues, however. They were bride and groom, she in a pink chiffon dress and high heels.

U sing a ladder, they clambered on to the circular roof of the pillbox and posed for a photographer standing below. It was a lovely vignette that said much about modern Vietnam: how far it has come in the 40 years since the end of a conflict that claimed millions of Vietnamese lives and obliterated infrastructure and landscape alike; how dynamic and optimistic its people have become.

When organised tourism from the West started in the Nineties the war was a focal point – the Cu Chi tunnels, in which the Viet Cong hid out, near Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) were a major draw. But the war is now a distant event for the Vietnamese, the majority of whom were born after hostilities ended.

When you arrive in the capital Hanoi, for example, I’m suggesting you head straight out of the city and into tranquil countryside to recover from the flight. Two days later, back in Hanoi, take a city tour with an experienced local guide who will show you the traditional sights, including the Temple of Literature.

From Hanoi the fantastical natural beauty of Halong Bay – karst limestone peaks rising from a shimmering sea – is a compulsory part of any trip.

If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.

Become a member and you can create your own personal ‘Bookshelf’. Imagine having a single searchable index of all your recipes – both digital and print!

Join a community of cookbook lovers & discover that
Eat Your Books is a great way to make better use
of your own collection

H ere’s the scene. The Hai Van Pass, which crosses coastal mountains between Hue and Danang, forms a natural barrier across Vietnam’s tiny waist. Its strategic importance through centuries of conflict is signified by the various fortifications that mark the summit – including a concrete pillbox from the Vietnam War.

On my last visit to Vietnam, we stopped on the top of the pass to enjoy the stupendous views of jungle-clad mountains sloping to the misty ocean. I was taking pictures when I noticed a couple preparing to assault the pillbox. They weren’t in combat fatigues, however. They were bride and groom, she in a pink chiffon dress and high heels.

U sing a ladder, they clambered on to the circular roof of the pillbox and posed for a photographer standing below. It was a lovely vignette that said much about modern Vietnam: how far it has come in the 40 years since the end of a conflict that claimed millions of Vietnamese lives and obliterated infrastructure and landscape alike; how dynamic and optimistic its people have become.

When organised tourism from the West started in the Nineties the war was a focal point – the Cu Chi tunnels, in which the Viet Cong hid out, near Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) were a major draw. But the war is now a distant event for the Vietnamese, the majority of whom were born after hostilities ended.

When you arrive in the capital Hanoi, for example, I’m suggesting you head straight out of the city and into tranquil countryside to recover from the flight. Two days later, back in Hanoi, take a city tour with an experienced local guide who will show you the traditional sights, including the Temple of Literature.

From Hanoi the fantastical natural beauty of Halong Bay – karst limestone peaks rising from a shimmering sea – is a compulsory part of any trip.

An intensive four week residential course to teach culinary skills, and to inspire a love and passion for food and cooking. Ideal for any age, learn to cook for fun, for family and friends or professionally. Learn more > >

The One Week Wonder! The ultimate impact cookery course! Learn to cook the food that you'll love to eat. We'll teach you how to cook even if you are only able to join us for a week. Learn more > >


Home - Ultimate Chalet Host Cookery Course

    If you are new here, you may want to learn a little more about how this site works. Eat Your Books has indexed recipes from leading cookbooks and magazines as well recipes from the best food websites and blogs.Become a member and you can create your own
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