The martian


There are a few hard truths you can learn from both the book and soon-to-be-released film The Martian . The first is: Don’t get stuck on Mars . The second: If you do get stuck on Mars, be really, really smart.

It’s hard to argue with wisdom like that, but if you have any doubt, you won’t after leaving the theater, fresh from a rousing, gripping and scientifically granular tutorial on what makes Mars tick—chemically, geologically, meteorologically—and why the planet is such an alluring and vexing place. Andy Weir artfully blended all of those seemingly unblendable elements in his 2011 novel and Ridley Scott hand-carried them to the screen without dropping and breaking a single one.

So: Go see The Martian . But still: Don’t expect all of the science to be what it should be. The hard part about good science fiction has always been the fiction part. How many liberties can you take and how big should they be before you lose credibility? In the case of The Martian , the answer is mixed.

Some of the movie’s errors are minor and even cosmetic. The Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena look nothing like the slick, futuristic places they appear to be on screen. Even in a relatively near future in which it’s possible to travel to and from Mars, the laws of economics and politics still apply, and Washington would never spend the money on architectural glitz when the drearier but serviceable facilities are still in place.

Other errors are a bit more technical, as when an unmanned supply vehicle is docking with the Mars mother ship and an astronaut is sent outside in a spacesuit to wave it in like an airport worker on a tarmac. But there’s no one in the cargo ship to see him waving and video cameras on both the arriving ship and the mother ship would make it possible to control the entire operation from an indoor console. One rule of thumb in space travel: never take the risk of a spacewalk unless it’s absolutely necessary—and in this case it’s not.

Still, those are quibbles. Much more disturbing is what is arguably the most important plot device in the movie: the massive windstorm that sweeps astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) away, causing his crew mates to abandon him on the planet, assuming he has been killed. That sets the entire castaway tale into motion, but on a false note, because while Mars does have winds, its atmosphere is barely 1% of the density of Earth’s, meaning it could never whip up anything like the fury it does in the story.

late 14c., marcien "of the planet Mars" (originally in reference to astrological influence), from Latin Martius "sacred to Mars; pertaining to the planet Mars," from Mars (genitive Martis ). The noun meaning "an inhabitant of the planet Mars" is attested from 1883.

There are a few hard truths you can learn from both the book and soon-to-be-released film The Martian . The first is: Don’t get stuck on Mars . The second: If you do get stuck on Mars, be really, really smart.

It’s hard to argue with wisdom like that, but if you have any doubt, you won’t after leaving the theater, fresh from a rousing, gripping and scientifically granular tutorial on what makes Mars tick—chemically, geologically, meteorologically—and why the planet is such an alluring and vexing place. Andy Weir artfully blended all of those seemingly unblendable elements in his 2011 novel and Ridley Scott hand-carried them to the screen without dropping and breaking a single one.

So: Go see The Martian . But still: Don’t expect all of the science to be what it should be. The hard part about good science fiction has always been the fiction part. How many liberties can you take and how big should they be before you lose credibility? In the case of The Martian , the answer is mixed.

Some of the movie’s errors are minor and even cosmetic. The Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena look nothing like the slick, futuristic places they appear to be on screen. Even in a relatively near future in which it’s possible to travel to and from Mars, the laws of economics and politics still apply, and Washington would never spend the money on architectural glitz when the drearier but serviceable facilities are still in place.

Other errors are a bit more technical, as when an unmanned supply vehicle is docking with the Mars mother ship and an astronaut is sent outside in a spacesuit to wave it in like an airport worker on a tarmac. But there’s no one in the cargo ship to see him waving and video cameras on both the arriving ship and the mother ship would make it possible to control the entire operation from an indoor console. One rule of thumb in space travel: never take the risk of a spacewalk unless it’s absolutely necessary—and in this case it’s not.

Still, those are quibbles. Much more disturbing is what is arguably the most important plot device in the movie: the massive windstorm that sweeps astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) away, causing his crew mates to abandon him on the planet, assuming he has been killed. That sets the entire castaway tale into motion, but on a false note, because while Mars does have winds, its atmosphere is barely 1% of the density of Earth’s, meaning it could never whip up anything like the fury it does in the story.

late 14c., marcien "of the planet Mars" (originally in reference to astrological influence), from Latin Martius "sacred to Mars; pertaining to the planet Mars," from Mars (genitive Martis ). The noun meaning "an inhabitant of the planet Mars" is attested from 1883.

Смотреть видео  · Directed by Ridley Scott. With Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Kristen Wiig, Kate Mara. An astronaut becomes stranded on Mars after his team assume him dead, and must ...

A Martian is a native inhabitant of the planet Mars. Although the search for evidence of life on Mars continues, many science fiction writers have imagined what ...

The Martian is a 2015 science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon. The screenplay by Drew Goddard is based on Andy Weir's 2011 novel of the ...

Men's and women's fashion analog smartwatch by Martian watch. Notification screen, voice commands, Voice calls, Fitness tracking …

08.06.2015  · THE MARTIAN | Teaser Trailer: During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a …

During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and ...

From the very opening moments of The Martian , one will be amazed with what Ridley Scott has created. The film opens on an incredibly barren, red, Martian landscape. It is gorgeous, instantly piques one's curiosity, and sets the stage for all that is to come.

Soon the film introduces us to a team of astronauts who have been sent to Mars to study it, buy when a storm hits they are forced to abandon the planet. One of their number, Mark Watney (Matt Damon), is struck by debris on the way back to the lander and, believing Watney dead, team leader Melissa Lewis (Jessica Chastain), takes off without him.

As we all know though, Watney survives the injury and the storm. That however does not make his situation any less dire as the astronauts' habitat on Mars was never meant to sustain life for the sort of extended period it will take NASA to get another ship to him. With nothing left but the material the crew abandoned and his own fortitude, Watney must figure out how to survive.

The Martian lives and dies on the back of Matt Damon's performance, and he is fantastic here. He makes Watney's emotional highs and lows relatable in this completely foreign situation.

Damon's job in The Martian is not an easy one. Watney spends much of his time alone, trying to figure out how he's going to grow food, make water, traverse long distances, and communicate with the folks back on Earth, and that forces Damon to play out many of his scenes alone, no easy task.

Watney creates a video log of his thoughts and experiments, and the best moments in an already great movie are listening to the audio from these logs, where Watney explains what he wants to do, or the results of what he has done, as the audience watches his progress. Much credit must go to Scott and writer Drew Goddard (the film is based on Andy Weir's book), for making Damon's one-sided video log feel like more than simply an excuse to get Damon talking when he is all alone on the planet. It instead feels like the exact sort of thing a scientist would do to document experiments in this sort of environment.

There are a few hard truths you can learn from both the book and soon-to-be-released film The Martian . The first is: Don’t get stuck on Mars . The second: If you do get stuck on Mars, be really, really smart.

It’s hard to argue with wisdom like that, but if you have any doubt, you won’t after leaving the theater, fresh from a rousing, gripping and scientifically granular tutorial on what makes Mars tick—chemically, geologically, meteorologically—and why the planet is such an alluring and vexing place. Andy Weir artfully blended all of those seemingly unblendable elements in his 2011 novel and Ridley Scott hand-carried them to the screen without dropping and breaking a single one.

So: Go see The Martian . But still: Don’t expect all of the science to be what it should be. The hard part about good science fiction has always been the fiction part. How many liberties can you take and how big should they be before you lose credibility? In the case of The Martian , the answer is mixed.

Some of the movie’s errors are minor and even cosmetic. The Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena look nothing like the slick, futuristic places they appear to be on screen. Even in a relatively near future in which it’s possible to travel to and from Mars, the laws of economics and politics still apply, and Washington would never spend the money on architectural glitz when the drearier but serviceable facilities are still in place.

Other errors are a bit more technical, as when an unmanned supply vehicle is docking with the Mars mother ship and an astronaut is sent outside in a spacesuit to wave it in like an airport worker on a tarmac. But there’s no one in the cargo ship to see him waving and video cameras on both the arriving ship and the mother ship would make it possible to control the entire operation from an indoor console. One rule of thumb in space travel: never take the risk of a spacewalk unless it’s absolutely necessary—and in this case it’s not.

Still, those are quibbles. Much more disturbing is what is arguably the most important plot device in the movie: the massive windstorm that sweeps astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) away, causing his crew mates to abandon him on the planet, assuming he has been killed. That sets the entire castaway tale into motion, but on a false note, because while Mars does have winds, its atmosphere is barely 1% of the density of Earth’s, meaning it could never whip up anything like the fury it does in the story.

There are a few hard truths you can learn from both the book and soon-to-be-released film The Martian . The first is: Don’t get stuck on Mars . The second: If you do get stuck on Mars, be really, really smart.

It’s hard to argue with wisdom like that, but if you have any doubt, you won’t after leaving the theater, fresh from a rousing, gripping and scientifically granular tutorial on what makes Mars tick—chemically, geologically, meteorologically—and why the planet is such an alluring and vexing place. Andy Weir artfully blended all of those seemingly unblendable elements in his 2011 novel and Ridley Scott hand-carried them to the screen without dropping and breaking a single one.

So: Go see The Martian . But still: Don’t expect all of the science to be what it should be. The hard part about good science fiction has always been the fiction part. How many liberties can you take and how big should they be before you lose credibility? In the case of The Martian , the answer is mixed.

Some of the movie’s errors are minor and even cosmetic. The Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena look nothing like the slick, futuristic places they appear to be on screen. Even in a relatively near future in which it’s possible to travel to and from Mars, the laws of economics and politics still apply, and Washington would never spend the money on architectural glitz when the drearier but serviceable facilities are still in place.

Other errors are a bit more technical, as when an unmanned supply vehicle is docking with the Mars mother ship and an astronaut is sent outside in a spacesuit to wave it in like an airport worker on a tarmac. But there’s no one in the cargo ship to see him waving and video cameras on both the arriving ship and the mother ship would make it possible to control the entire operation from an indoor console. One rule of thumb in space travel: never take the risk of a spacewalk unless it’s absolutely necessary—and in this case it’s not.

Still, those are quibbles. Much more disturbing is what is arguably the most important plot device in the movie: the massive windstorm that sweeps astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) away, causing his crew mates to abandon him on the planet, assuming he has been killed. That sets the entire castaway tale into motion, but on a false note, because while Mars does have winds, its atmosphere is barely 1% of the density of Earth’s, meaning it could never whip up anything like the fury it does in the story.

late 14c., marcien "of the planet Mars" (originally in reference to astrological influence), from Latin Martius "sacred to Mars; pertaining to the planet Mars," from Mars (genitive Martis ). The noun meaning "an inhabitant of the planet Mars" is attested from 1883.

Смотреть видео  · Directed by Ridley Scott. With Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, Kristen Wiig, Kate Mara. An astronaut becomes stranded on Mars after his team assume him dead, and must ...

A Martian is a native inhabitant of the planet Mars. Although the search for evidence of life on Mars continues, many science fiction writers have imagined what ...

The Martian is a 2015 science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon. The screenplay by Drew Goddard is based on Andy Weir's 2011 novel of the ...

Men's and women's fashion analog smartwatch by Martian watch. Notification screen, voice commands, Voice calls, Fitness tracking …

08.06.2015  · THE MARTIAN | Teaser Trailer: During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a …

During a manned mission to Mars, Astronaut Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead after a fierce storm and left behind by his crew. But Watney has survived and ...


Martian - Wikipedia

The Martian (2015) - IMDb

    There are a few hard truths you can learn from both the book and soon-to-be-released film The Martian . The first is: Don’t get stuck on Mars . The second: If you do get stuck on Mars, be really, really smart.It’s hard to argue with wisdom
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