The hundred thousand kingdoms: inheritance trilogy, book 1


Is there a real or meaningful difference between Gini's focus on congregational accountability and Peter's emphasis on "congregations and beyond"? Probably not. After all, the board's list of " sources of authority and accountability " includes not just the member congregations but also "current and future generations of Unitarian Universalists," and the board has been particularly interested in how youth and young adults are being served.

Furthermore, the bylaw revisions that opened the way for non-local "congregations" to join the UUA also came from the board.

I don't see a huge difference on that point.

Did Gini do this all by herself, or was this the work of the Board which has a collective wisdom accumulated over several decades.

Most Board alumni think "about time." Wonder why?

But it is easier to see it as the work of "Great Women and Men" and not understand that the moderator is a facilliator of a group. The incoming Moderators will bring different facilliative skills, different than Gini, different than each other. But the Board will develop its consensus.

I am a member of the Board and being a member of the Board privileges me with a little experience in the practical problems of governance. But the Board speaks as a Board, and members speak as members.

Hayward started this morning ritual six years ago, typically getting in a first run by late October, using an app to track how much ground he covers in a season. The goal is 100,000 vertical feet — that’s 31/3 Everests — by the time the snow is gone. His usual route spans 1,500 vertical feet, which he’s scaled in 27 minutes at his fastest. Once, on a pristine powder day, he did three laps in a row, starting before sunrise, wearing a headlamp.

The 44-year-old grew up in Alna and started skiing on the Nordic trails at nearby Hidden Valley Nature Center. Now, he lives in Bethel, where he’s director of experiential learning at Gould Academy. He’s also a Registered Maine Guide as well as a member of Sunday River’s ski patrol and the Mahoosuc Mountain Search and Rescue Team. A few years ago, he recorded one of the first skiing descents of Mt. Katahdin’s treacherous Chimney Couloir. More recently, he ran the Hundred Mile Wilderness, knocking out the normally weeklong trek in 38 hours.

Most mornings, before lifts open, Hayward has Sunday River to himself, but not all the time anymore. “More and more people are earning turns,” he says — that is, hoofing it up the mountain in order to lay fresh tracks. “If a storm falls at the right time, you’ll see 20 people up here.” Some days, he brings students with him, one time leading a crew of 27 (“Get them away from their phones,” he says). Other days, two friends — Rob Manning and Bob Harkins — climb with him. The three have a friendly competition to rack up the most vertical feet, comparing stats as the winter goes along. It’s not so much about winning, Hayward says, as about “pushing each other to make sure we ski a ton.”

Within an hour of starting out, Hayward reached the peak. It was late in the season, and the whistling of a white-throated sparrow was the only sound. Hayward stripped off his skins and checked his watch: 98,000 feet. “By the end of the week I should have it,” he said. “Maybe Wednesday.” He hadn’t given much thought to how he’d mark the occasion — besides, by now he’s already reset his odometer and started all over again.

“I’ll probably drink a beer,” he decided. The silhouette of Mount Washington floated behind him like a hologram. Then, he took a sip of water and skied back down.

Jaed Coffin is the author of the memoir A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants and teaches in the University of New Hampshire's MFA creative writing program. He lives in Brunswick.

Every now and then, you hear about a book by an author you’ve heard of. The book has a great title, gets good reviews, and is generally well-received. You see it on Amazon, but the price is a little higher than you’re willing to pay. So you decide to wait until it goes on sale.

Kingdoms takes place on an alternate Earth, where… well… 100,000 kingdoms are led by the Arameri family, who lives within a Space-Needle-like palace called Sky. The current leader of the Arameri, Dekarta, is getting on in years and wants to pass the mantle of leadership to one of his full-blooded Arameri heirs, Scimina and Relad.

But there’s a third Arameri heir, Yeine, warrior-princess of the far-off land of Darr — and the main character of Kingdoms . Brought to Sky by Dekarta, her grandfather, she finds herself embroiled in a power struggle for the leadership of the Arameri — and the entire world — as she becomes increasingly aware of exactly why she was ordered to Sky in the first place: the Arameri want her to die.

In this case, the creatures in question are the gods of the planet — Itempas, Nahadoth, and Enefa, roughly corresponding to God, Satan, and Eve/Lilith. Nahadoth lives among the Arameri; Itempas appears when the Arameri passes leadership on to the next heir. Unlike the real world, these gods actually provably exist, and can do godlike things. There are others, including the childlike Sieh, but it’s really all about Nahadoth.

Once Yeine gets situated in Sky, the story turns into a fantastical soap opera, with plots and counterplots, and in the middle of it all a single character who things just seem to happen to. Yeine does act upon her environment, but usually not until the environment has acted upon her.

To go back to my comment on storytelling style — the best way to explain it is that I felt like I was reading Anita Blake: God Hunter . The same problems I have with Laurell K. Hamilton’s storytelling, I had with Kingdoms (although this book was well-edited, whereas some of Hamilton’s novels unfortunately contain grammatical errors and spelling inconsistencies). I also didn’t really care for the digressions into Yeine’s dreams about what the gods were doing, or had done. They didn’t hold my interest.

Is there a real or meaningful difference between Gini's focus on congregational accountability and Peter's emphasis on "congregations and beyond"? Probably not. After all, the board's list of " sources of authority and accountability " includes not just the member congregations but also "current and future generations of Unitarian Universalists," and the board has been particularly interested in how youth and young adults are being served.

Furthermore, the bylaw revisions that opened the way for non-local "congregations" to join the UUA also came from the board.

I don't see a huge difference on that point.

Did Gini do this all by herself, or was this the work of the Board which has a collective wisdom accumulated over several decades.

Most Board alumni think "about time." Wonder why?

But it is easier to see it as the work of "Great Women and Men" and not understand that the moderator is a facilliator of a group. The incoming Moderators will bring different facilliative skills, different than Gini, different than each other. But the Board will develop its consensus.

I am a member of the Board and being a member of the Board privileges me with a little experience in the practical problems of governance. But the Board speaks as a Board, and members speak as members.

Hayward started this morning ritual six years ago, typically getting in a first run by late October, using an app to track how much ground he covers in a season. The goal is 100,000 vertical feet — that’s 31/3 Everests — by the time the snow is gone. His usual route spans 1,500 vertical feet, which he’s scaled in 27 minutes at his fastest. Once, on a pristine powder day, he did three laps in a row, starting before sunrise, wearing a headlamp.

The 44-year-old grew up in Alna and started skiing on the Nordic trails at nearby Hidden Valley Nature Center. Now, he lives in Bethel, where he’s director of experiential learning at Gould Academy. He’s also a Registered Maine Guide as well as a member of Sunday River’s ski patrol and the Mahoosuc Mountain Search and Rescue Team. A few years ago, he recorded one of the first skiing descents of Mt. Katahdin’s treacherous Chimney Couloir. More recently, he ran the Hundred Mile Wilderness, knocking out the normally weeklong trek in 38 hours.

Most mornings, before lifts open, Hayward has Sunday River to himself, but not all the time anymore. “More and more people are earning turns,” he says — that is, hoofing it up the mountain in order to lay fresh tracks. “If a storm falls at the right time, you’ll see 20 people up here.” Some days, he brings students with him, one time leading a crew of 27 (“Get them away from their phones,” he says). Other days, two friends — Rob Manning and Bob Harkins — climb with him. The three have a friendly competition to rack up the most vertical feet, comparing stats as the winter goes along. It’s not so much about winning, Hayward says, as about “pushing each other to make sure we ski a ton.”

Within an hour of starting out, Hayward reached the peak. It was late in the season, and the whistling of a white-throated sparrow was the only sound. Hayward stripped off his skins and checked his watch: 98,000 feet. “By the end of the week I should have it,” he said. “Maybe Wednesday.” He hadn’t given much thought to how he’d mark the occasion — besides, by now he’s already reset his odometer and started all over again.

“I’ll probably drink a beer,” he decided. The silhouette of Mount Washington floated behind him like a hologram. Then, he took a sip of water and skied back down.

Jaed Coffin is the author of the memoir A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants and teaches in the University of New Hampshire's MFA creative writing program. He lives in Brunswick.

Is there a real or meaningful difference between Gini's focus on congregational accountability and Peter's emphasis on "congregations and beyond"? Probably not. After all, the board's list of " sources of authority and accountability " includes not just the member congregations but also "current and future generations of Unitarian Universalists," and the board has been particularly interested in how youth and young adults are being served.

Furthermore, the bylaw revisions that opened the way for non-local "congregations" to join the UUA also came from the board.

I don't see a huge difference on that point.

Did Gini do this all by herself, or was this the work of the Board which has a collective wisdom accumulated over several decades.

Most Board alumni think "about time." Wonder why?

But it is easier to see it as the work of "Great Women and Men" and not understand that the moderator is a facilliator of a group. The incoming Moderators will bring different facilliative skills, different than Gini, different than each other. But the Board will develop its consensus.

I am a member of the Board and being a member of the Board privileges me with a little experience in the practical problems of governance. But the Board speaks as a Board, and members speak as members.


The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (The Inheritance Trilogy.

100,000 - Wikipedia

    Is there a real or meaningful difference between Gini's focus on congregational accountability and Peter's emphasis on "congregations and beyond"? Probably not. After all, the board's list of " sources of authority and
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